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When it comes to street harassment, you are not alone.

You are part of a global community of people who are boldly speaking out — and it’s working.
Your stories are inspiring legislators, journalists, academics, and the guy on the corner to
take street harassment seriously and create solutions that make everyone feel safe.

Share your story today.

The stories below are recent encounters with street harassment from around the world. Click the “I’ve Got Your Back” button under each one to anonymously show your support.

 

Story, Verbal

Emma’s Story: Harassed after the Hospital

I had been to the hospital and was unfamiliar with the bus route and had to wait for about an hour in central Halifax. Whilst walking towards Smiths a group of men dispersed in the crowd were watching me. At least one asked me if I had been paid for it. I was harassed for ten minutes on and off and I felt uncomfortable standing near the bus stop. I dislike smokers and found I could only waste ten minutes in the vegan cafe that I only discovered about six weeks ago. I felt very uncomfortable going to do a bit of shopping. As a staunch Christian feminist I will avoid like the plague the area as it is clearly unsafe. I try not to use public transport at all and I stopped going to Bradford due to the roaring car engines and thumping car radios.

I chose Halifax hospital due to it being nice and modern but it is too far to go if travelling by bus.

Just now my neighbour’s daughter’s boyfriend said something derogatory as I was mowing the lawn.

I've got your back!
1+

Published on May 22, 2015 at 5:29 pm

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Stalking, Story, Verbal, youth

Emma’s Story: Targeted at School

I believe it was my senior year of high school. I had dressed up nicely that day, wearing a dress – heels and all – to promote a dance concert that was the following evening. During one of my classes I left, most likely to use the restroom, and on my way back to the classroom I was approached by a male student in the hallway. I had never met him before, he was probably in a different grade, so I continued walking past him. He started trying to get my attention by calling me “shawty”. He began following me down the hallway yelling things at me. “Damn girl, why you all dressed up?” “You look real good today.” “Why don’t you turn around so I can get a good look at ya?” I did what most women do and ignored him. He then became angry. I could hear is pace slow behind me until he stopped and shouted, “Fine. Rude bitch.”
I never said anything to this boy or school authorities (which I now realize I should have at least brought it to their attention) but it does worry me that even though his volume was so loud, in an empty hallway, with classes going on, that none of the teachers or students thought it necessary to stop harassment on school grounds. That was not the only time I was the victim of cat-calling on campus during school hours. It never even mattered what I was wearing or if I was alone or if the harasser was alone.
Street harassment shouldn’t happen anywhere, let alone the halls of a school. I would urge Eaglecrest High School to pay more attention to the way their students treat their classmates. I can assure them I was not breaking the dress code that day or any day, but it never stopped me from being the target of someone’s harassment.

I've got your back!
5+

Published on May 21, 2015 at 9:20 pm

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Nonverbal Harassment, Story, Verbal

Laura’s Story: Bad Bystanders

To save money, I ride public transportation to work. Every day something inappropriate is said about my appearance and body, but this past Friday I was genuinely afraid. I was riding the bus to the metrolink. There were not any seats left, so I stood. I did not mind standing. Then this man stood up from his seat and said “Baby, come on have my seat. Sit down, baby” and I declined the offer. He insisted and was not going to sit down. So, I accepted the seat. When I approached the seat he got in my space and turned with me and I fell into the seat and he boxed me in. Then he started talking about how sexy he thought I was. And then smelled me and said I smelled nice too. Then I tried to ignore him, but he was so close and I did not know what he was going to do. He kept talking “If I was your man, I would never let go of you, baby let me be your man” me: “No, I already have somebody and we are very happy.” bystanders laugh as this goes on. Mt eyes search for someone to care, or help. But my eyes only see smiles. One man tells him to lay off me through spurts of laughter. Then the harasser reaches in his bag and gives me a disc. The same man who told him to layoff says: “girl, do not throw that away, that is a free movie and it is money” and I continue to try my best to ignore both of them…finally it is my stop and I make my way off that bus as fast as I can and throw the damn disc away, too. I am just so tired of this happening to me. I am sick of being told it is my fault because of my body type and appearance.

I've got your back!
13+

Published on May 20, 2015 at 6:09 pm

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Nonverbal Harassment, Story, Verbal, youth

Ava’s Story: Trouble on Twitter

One of my friends that I had known for a few months sent me a dm on Twitter. He tried to ask me out and I told him I had a boyfriend. After learning this, he persistently asked for nudes saying things like “it doesn’t have to be shirtless” and “it’s not that bad”, “can I at least get a look at your underwear drawer?”.
I told him no and I had no idea what to do.
After a week I finally told my parents. He got in trouble (not a lot) and I got grounded and interrogated on “what I said to provoke it”.
We were 15.

I've got your back!
16+

Published on May 19, 2015 at 4:27 pm

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Story, Verbal

Arabella’s Story: “It is unacceptable to be harassed just because you happen to be female”

It happens on an everyday basis, virtually. If you are female and walk down the street you get asked, “How much”, and slag, or slut, etc. from random men passing by or from men in cars shouting out to you. It’s no good blaming it on what a woman wears, because even when you are wearing no make-up, no high heels, hair unbrushed and a long dress they still do it. Also, the people driving the cars should be concentrating on the traffic and road, not neglecting it to look out the window and harass a woman. I would say, “How much” is the most common phrase and then you are asked 70p, etc. It is unacceptable to be harassed just because you happen to be female, especially in the 21st century.

I've got your back!
12+

Published on May 18, 2015 at 7:01 am

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