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Legal Momentum’s Lisalyn R. Jacobs Shares Her Story With Hollaback!

BY VICTORIA TRAVERS

Lisalyn and her son

Hollaback! has been keenly following the fantastic work being completed by the National Task Force to End Sexual Violence Against Women. We were lucky enough to interview Lisalyn R. Jacobs of Legal Momentum, the organization’s Vice President for Government Relations and an all round kick-ass player in the fight to end violence against women.

Lisalyn R. Jacobs works for Legal Momentum, the nation’s oldest legal defense and education fund committed to advancing the rights of women and girls. Lisalyn is the organization’s Vice President for Government Relations, making her the chief lobbyist and advocate with federal and U.S Congress:

“My work is primarily focused on the issues of violence against women and poverty, but we are involved in a variety of other work from advocacy around women’s economic issues, to judicial nominations.”

This particular role came as a bit of a surprise for the tenacious lawyer. In March 2003 she had originally applied for another job at Legal Momentum, but after officials realized her experience in federal laws concerning the organization’s advocacy projects they offered her another role instead.

Lisalyn grew up in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., attended Goucher and Oberlin colleges and attended Stanford Law School. She remembers that she “wanted to be a lawyer and advocate by the time” she “was in middle school.” But faced the challenged of defining exactly what “kind of advocacy” she “was passionate about as against ending up in corporate America somewhere, which was more in line with the way law schools were training their students.”

She started her career at the National Partnership for Women and Families with the support of Georgetown’s Women’s Law & Public Policy Fellowship. Lisalyn joined the Office of Policy Development of the U.S. Justice Department in 1995 and worked on a number of issues including implementation of the Violence Against Women Act, the welfare reform law, judicial nominations and affirmative action.

Lisalyn first heard about Hollaback! a couple of years ago after her organization assembled a book about “the history of the drive for women’s rights in this country.” Hollaback! was featured in that book. Lisalyn notes that:

“It’s hard to grow up in the U.S. and NOT have experiences with street harassment.”

Lisalyn recalled her own memories of street harassment, telling us:

“I remember not too long after graduating from law school, I got into an argument on the streets of Washington, D.C. with a guy who had either harassed me or the friend I was talking to.  At some point during the exchange, I recall telling the guy that he was objectifying me and afterwards, thinking that I had been in school just a little too long!”

The wonderful thing about Lisalyn is that not only is she a fearless change-maker, but she gets us, like Hollaback! she understands that although harassment can seem like a very solitary experience, you do not have to feel alone. Her advice to anyone experiencing harassment or abuse is this:

“Whether you are experiencing the violence or trying to help/figure out how to approach or support the person who is, you don’t have to do it alone.  There is help out there for you.  You can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE, and they can direct you to services in your community.  You can call your local rape crisis hot-line, or the stalking hot-line.  There is a world of folks out there ready and able to help you.  Let them.  Don’t wait.  Get safe!!”

So we salute you Lisalyn for all your hard work, activism and change making!

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The Hollaback! Effect: Have You Felt It?

Please welcome our newest Hollaback! Maria Luiza Welton! Maria is a Hunter College Honors graduate that is currently studying at Columbia University for her Masters in social work. Maria lives in New York and is super-psyched to be joining the Hollaback! blogging team. Read on to see what drew Maria and why she always is inclined to Hollaback!:

BY MARIA LUIZA WELTON

“The Hollaback! Effect

I’m very excited to be joining the Hollaback! blogging team. Having experienced firsthand how pervasive the issue of street-harassment is and how it can wear you down, I feel very passionate about becoming one of the many voices already taking part in anti-street harassment the movement. I strongly support speaking up, and my experience in taking action is my proof it creates positive change.

I first learned about Hollaback! when searching for ways to stop the daily street harassment I’d been facing since I was 12. In reading through the personal accounts, I felt so empowered by how much I saw my own experiences in other people’s stories.

Shortly after, I mustered up the courage to Hollaback! for the first time. My first target was a scrap metal shop where I would get my early morning harassment. As I walked by the kissy noises and teeth sucking, I walked up to one of them and boomed “That’s enough!”  I was stunned at myself that I did it, and the group of dudes were equally frozen. They never bothered me again.

I started noticing changes in myself after I started to Hollaback! My body was more relaxed when I went out, I stopped hiding in my clothes and I stopped feeling ashamed. I felt like I had taken back my space and my right to exist without it meaning other people be entitled to disrespect me. And I don’t know if this is some kind of Hollaback! sorcery or if I started to give off different vibes and body language, but the street harassment went from happening at least once a day, to happening maybe a few times a year. I can’t explain how this happened,  but everywhere I went, it stopped.

Has anyone else had this Hollaback! effect?”

 

 

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Jumo Organizations Challenge: Vote For Us!!

GOOD Maker have joined forces with Jumo to further their mission to help people take meaningful action in the world. They are offering $2,500 in grant funding for projects that are exclusively from organizations who are former Jumo members and we have entered!

So support us! Check out our unique submission where you can read about what we are currently doing and why we deserve that grant. Then give us your vote so we can kick street harassment to the curb!

Voting opened on April 3 and ends on April 17 at noon PT, so get clicking and give us your support. YOU do have the power to end street harassment.

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Hollaback! San José: End Street Harassment

Cross-posted from Hollaback! San José.

End Street Harassment Room in the 8th Annual Tunnel of Oppression
Tuesday April 3, 2012 // 9am-8pm,
Wednesday April 4, 2012 // 9am-8pm,
Thursday April 5, 2012 // 9am-12pm.
SJSU Student Union Ballroom
We have the power to end street harassment. For the full experience, visit SJSU V-Day‘s Hollaback San José: End Street Harassment room in the 8th Annual Tunnel of Oppression.

This spring break, we created a film with women bystanders and Yan Yin K. Choy’s spoken word, “You Wanted to See My Vagina: We Have the Power To End Street Harassment.”

Chara Bui also animated a video to End Street Harassment.

We also worked with male-identified allies to inspire bystander prevention,  ”Shit Men Say to Men Who Say Shit to Women on the Streets of San José! 

We also created a mural. Thanks to Joshi, Sharon Singh, Alessa Baldonado, Mirna Mendoza, Lauren Doyle, Eva Roa, Lindsay Sporleder, and Chara Bui for your help with the mixed media. Drawn by yours truly, Yan Yin K. Choy.

The Tunnel of Oppression is free, and open to the public.

 

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April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month

This April, the 2012 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) campaign centers on promoting healthy sexuality to prevent sexual violence.

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A Week in Our Shoes: WEST COAST EDITION

Hello Hollabackers!

Welcome to this week’s west coast edition! I’m on a plane, heading back back from a week in San Francisco as we speak. Veronica, Natalie, Victoria, and Catherine have been holding down for the fort in New York, and of course, our site leaders continue to kick street harassment to the curb internationally.  Here’s the roundup!

Ian and Tiffany from Berkeley and me!

I talked, a lot! I was invited to speak on a killer panel with Shelby Knox (of Change.org and “The Miseducation of Shelby Knox fame) and Jamia Wilson (VP of Programs at the Women’s Media Center) at SEX::TECH, a conference put on by ISIS and dedicated to using technology to spread the gospel about sexual health to youth. I also spoke at the City College of San Francisco and UC Berkeley. At Berkeley, I got to meet our UH-MAZ-ING site leaders, Ian and Tiffany.  They are working on getting harassment education instituted for incoming freshman. Totally revolutionary.

The tour-du-legislators continues! In my absence, Natalie boldly took the reigns and presented to the entire Brooklyn delegation of the New York City Council! Go Natalie!

The international movement is rocking and rolling! Our Southern California site leader Shira Tarrant has been blogging about street harassment for Ms. Magazine’s Ms. Blog. Also in California, we got a mention in The Gothamist this week after a woman snapped a picture of a creepy man that tried to kidnap her in LA. On the other side of the country, a french documentary company is coming to interview me tonight for their documentary on street harassment. A little look at france.ihollaback.org, and yep, I’d say they could use it.

And if you’re in the New York City area, please join us for our screening of War Zone, a documentary about street harassment.  We’re co-hosting it with our friends (and former office-mates) Women’s eNews. Tickets are $10 and are on sale now.

HOLLA and out!

Emily

 

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HOLLAWho? Meet South Africa.

Meet Melissa, the savvy social media activist with lots of ideas, fighting street harassment in South Africa.

Why do you HOLLA?  Why do I HOLLA? Why didn’t I holla back in the past?! I HOLLA because I experience street harassment on a nearly daily basis, because I live in a country that is dragging its feet in the past. I want to be part of the change, and I want to educate men and women about harassment because I find many of them don’t really know the difference between abuse and being polite (true story!).

What’s your signature Hollaback?  “Will you say that to your mother/daughter?”

What’s your craft?  I’m a social media manager, I specialise in social media policy and strategy and manage the online reputation of other brands and companies. I have a sneaky wine lover streak.

HOLLAfact about your city:  According to a Human Rights Watch report, 68% of women in South Africa have been subjected to some form of sexual harassment.

What was your first experience with street harassment?  I can’t remember my first experience, but I remember one of my earliest. I just got my hair done and was walking out of the shopping mall when a delivery man yelled “Hello girl!” in the most slimy tone of voice. It shattered my confidence at that moment, instead of feeling pampered and happy after a trip to the hair dresser, I felt violated and helpless in such a public space. People were standing around, nobody said a word, not even me. I just walked away, angry that I had no clever comeback, nothing to say, all the time feeling his eyes boring into my soul as I pretended not to hear.

Define your style:  Laid back and inconsistent. I drift between fashion trends and classic pieces. I’m outspoken AND shy.

My superheroine power is…Flight.

What do you collect?  I collect various things, wine, fighter-jet books, and specs and small model plane kits, badges.

Say you’re Queen for the day.  What would you do to end street harassment? I’d order every school to have mandatory gender-neutral ‘Good Manners’ classes for juniors and seniors and for their parents. This won’t be about what to say at the dinner table (ok maybe that to!), but how to properly speak to people, how to pay a compliment to another person, how to RESPECT a person, how to defend a person, how to say “That’s not ok”, how to ask for help. My mom always said this stuff should be taught at home, but I think parents should be included in these classes too so that everyone learns.

If you could leave the world one piece of advice, what would it be?  Treat others the way you would like to be treated, it’s all about respect.

What inspires you?  Change inspires me, I see things changing all around me, especially in this country. We’ve gone through massive, urgent changes and I’ve seen the positive side of this. It inspires me to take action.

In the year 2020, street harassment…Will be an embarrassing phenomenon that people experienced in the dark ages and looked back on in disgust like racism.

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Ryan Gosling Has Your Back

BY CATHERINE FAVORITE

Ryan Gosling knows what bystander intervention is all about. Earlier this week, the actor much celebrated for his mind and acting talents stepped in when he saw a woman about to get hit by a taxi cab. In New York City, it can be all too easy to dismiss strangers in need of help, but this story serves as a nice reminder and example of how to behave like a decent human being from time to time.

The woman Gosling stopped right before she stepped into oncoming traffic, just so happened to be British journalist, Laurie Penny, who made a fantastic point on the celebrity-obsessed frenzy that followed:

“What’s more, I really do object to being framed as the ditzy damsel in distress in this story. I do not mean any disrespect to Ryan Gosling, who is an excellent actor and, by all accounts, a personable and decent chap. I thought he was marvelous in The Ides of March, and will feel weird about objectifying him in future now that I have encountered him briefly as an actual human.

But as a feminist, a writer, and a gentlewoman of fortune, I refuse to be cast in any sort of boring supporting female role, even though I have occasional trouble crossing the road, and even though I did swoon the teeniest tiniest bit when I realized it was him. I think that’s lazy storytelling, and I’m sure Ryan Gosling would agree with me.”

For this, we fully support Laurie Penny’s point on not portraying women as damsels in distress; the dangers of objectifying anyone (though we still enjoy the occasional Ryan Gosling meme); and the realization that it should not be a major headline anytime a person helps out a stranger. Bystander intervention is for everyone, if you see someone who looks like they are being harassed by a stranger, or about to get hit by a taxi, don’t just stand there!

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Attention All Visionaries!

If you have an idea for creating positive change, whether it be for solving a global human rights issue, something going on in your local community or creating lasting environmental or social change, then consider submitting your idea by May 1, 2012 to the first ever Global Project Fair by the Worldwide Visionaries community to receive support for turning your ideas into action! What have you got to lose? Even the simplest of ideas can have a big impact on the world.

Categories include:

Visionary Projects: Everyone who submits a project in the Global Project Fair
will receive a Worldwide Visionaries digital badge of endorsement to honor your participation. Proudly display your digital badge on your website, profile or portfolio to let others know about the positive contribution you are making to the world!

Individual Projects: Individuals or small groups who are not currently in a school setting, age 13+

Businesses, standing nonprofit organizations and political groups cannot be included.
$1,000 will be awarded to outstanding projects from this category

Student Projects: For all global, secondary and post-secondary (junior high through university) students, age 13+

The project can be from an individual or small group collaborating on the submission.
$1,000 will be awarded to outstanding projects from this category

Educational Collaborative Projects: Class projects coordinated and submitted by a teacher or faculty member ON BEHALF OF THEIR STUDENTS

This category is for educators from all global, primary through post-secondary classes
(elementary though university), to coordinate their students in completing a collaborative project that the educator will submit on the students’ behalf. Note that this category is equally focused on the collaborative efforts of the students, and the educator’s role as the project coordinator and submission liaison.
$1,000 will be awarded to outstanding projects from this category

Added bonus: All awardees will have the opportunity to ‘pay it forward’ by selecting a project from from the Fair (of their choosing) they would like to support with a matching $1,000 award.

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