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Stuff People Say to Teen Girls

Well done, ladies! The video was done in partnership with Hollaback Philly (@HollabackPhilly) and their local partners @FAANMail!

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Lorena’s story: I turned my head, looked him in the eyes, and said “No.”

I was walking to the store last night; no makeup, glasses on, hair in a bun, jeans & a t-shirt. Guy in a car is on Parker street and I can feel him looking at me. Im on the phone with a friend talking into a speaker headset. He says something to me, even though its obvious Im on the phone. I hear it, but not the exact words, and chose to ignore it. He pulls out next to me and says; “Hey (loudly) Do you want a ride?” I turned my head, looked him in the eyes, and said “No.” Turned back and kept walking. He sat there for a second, registering what had just happened, and then drove off.

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EVAW’s efforts to make London the Safest City for Women in the World

Cross-posted from Stop Street Harassment

Will London become the safest city in the world for women?

Maybe!

This is the goal of the Ending Violence Against Women (EVAW) Coalition in London and they’re working hard to make it happen.

And of course, the absence of street harassment and public sexual assault is a requirement for any safe city.

I recently chatted via skype with the EVAW director Holly Dustin and found out that they are working to address street harassment/harassment on public transportation and while these are relatively new issues for them, already they’re having a lot of success because it is such a big problem for women in London.

To gather data (we always need more research!!), they conducted a YouGov poll about harassment on the London public transportation system.

They write that the poll: “revealed that more than a quarter of women in London do not always feel safe while using public transport. Many survey respondents said they wanted action on station staffing, lighting and policing. Feeling unsafe puts many more women than men off using the buses and trains at certain times, or in certain places, and urgently needs addressing by the transport authorities and as such by the mayor. We received wide London media coverage for our findings which seemed to strike a chord.”

It even struck a chord with the candidates for Mayor of London. EVAW has successfully lobbied each one to pledge to improve women’s safety if elected, including by addressing sexual harassment and assault on public transportation. Here are the manifestos by candidates Siobhan Benita, Boris Johnson Ken Livingstone and Brian Paddick. Elections are this week.

This is the 10-point plan EVAW suggests the new Mayor will need to take on in order to make London the safest city for women.

Additionally, the 2012 Summer Olympics will be held in London and EVAW is working hard on a campaign to make sure the city IS safe for everyone during it.

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The Twisted Path of Street Harassment

From Erik Kondo's blog “3A's of Street Harassment Disruption"

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Miriam’s story: #bystanderFAIL

I was walking south on 7th Ave on my lunch break. As I crossed 27th, a man on a bicycle passed behind me and said “big ass!” I turned around and when I made eye contact with him he winked. I flipped him off. He continued east on 27th (or so I thought) and I continued south on 7th Ave. As I crossed 26th, I saw him pull up next to me, having apparently turned around (going the wrong way back down 27th) in order to follow me, flip me off, and call me a bitch. I screamed something at him – I was so angry and freaked out that I can’t remember what I said – and he sped off south on 7th Ave.

This happened around 3:15 on a Monday with people everywhere. Not one person reacted, came to my defense, or asked me what had happened or if I was okay afterward.

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HOLLAWho? Meet Baltimore

Meet Jenn Gallienne of the Hollaback! Baltimore team, a sassy mover and shaker dedicated to making positive change in the world and an all round awesome lady.

Why do you HOLLA? Because it is TOTALLY UNACCEPTABLE to be objectified and harassed on a daily basis because of your gender identity, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, sex etc. IT IS NOT OKAY that it has become a social norm that our society has settled on as being part of our daily lives. ALL OF US deserve to walk down the street feeling SAFE without being objectified. Also, because my friends and loved ones in the LGBTQQI community deserve to be in public without being called a “faggot, a dyke, a tranny, an it.” They shouldn’t have to be afraid to hold their partner’s hand and they shouldn’t have to change their appearance. These are OUR streets too! It’s time to claim them!

What’s your signature Hollaback? A glare.

What’s your craft? Petting Cats, Making cupcakes, advocating, and social workin’ my heart out.

HOLLAfact about your city: Edgar Allen Poe’s grave is here.

What was your first experience with street harassment? I don’t know if I can recall my very first experience but I definitely vividly remember the first time I got called a dyke walking down the street with my best friend after school. My friend got so upset she punched the guy that was calling us names. In the year 2020, street harassment will be  finally accepted and recognized as a form of gender based violence. However, I don’t think the fight will be over yet.

What do you collect? Memories. Cupcake themed things. Tattoos. Those positive quotes that come on a yogi tea bag. Letters. Cards ( I have a whole wall of them).

If you could leave the world one piece of advice, what would it be? I am just going to quote Ariel Gore here “Your heart is the size of your fist, keep loving, keep fighting.”

What inspires you? My father, my step-mother, survivors, those investing their lives to making this world a better place. CHANGE. Hope. Movers/shakers/believers/Doers!

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Ef’s Story: They need to learn why harassment is wrong

The music block at our school is shared with the neighbouring boys’ school, and the boys’ field is between the girl’s school and the music block.

So I was walking back from the music block at break when a nasty little boy from… well I don’t know what year but can’t have been any older than 13, said ‘Hey good looking’ to me in a gross ‘I’m obviously being a dick’ kind of way.

So I carried on walking like I usually have the few times this has happened.

I was already feeling stressed and annoyed about the exams coming up and how the lesson hadn’t gone so well, so I was very annoyed.

But then two steps away instead of completely just walking off I turned around and screamed ‘F**K OFF!’ at him.

The look on his face annoyed me even more, because it was like ‘I didn’t deserve that shouting’. But he did.

If this ever happens again and I’m not feeling so stressed, I’ll take the time to stop whoever he is, tell him exactly why he’s being and arse and why he should never do it again.

Because a 16 year old girl shouldn’t feel intimidated or worried walking THROUGH HER OWN SCHOOL by a boy YOUNGER THAN HER.

I also think I will make some posters to hand to a teacher at the boys’ school on why being a creep is wrong.
Because they obviously need to learn.

(I’ve written way more that i should but man I’m so angry by this. Even though it wasn’t THAT bad…)

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Brittany’s Story: “Listen to your gut”

As a young female college student, I had always been told not to walk home alone or take the “short cut” if it was unsafe. But I’d taken the short way home plenty of times in this city to get home from the library, especially in the dark, and have had no problems. On the way home from a friend’s house tonight, I was in a rush to get home. I had a weird gut feeling when I thought about taking the short cut- I have to pass a run-down convenience store, and a section of government housing- but I ignored it. That was a mistake.
I was just about at the end of the short cut, almost home, when a group of 3 or 4 guys came out of nowhere and began to follow me. At first, they were distant. But they shouted “Nice ass!” and “Hey sweetie!” after me, just as I turned the corner to walk down my street. I picked up my pace; they turned onto my street and continued their cat-calling, even more vulgar while they laughed. I turned down into my driveway, and knew I couldn’t go to my house. At first I went around the other side of it, and waited. Then I saw my neighbor’s light on. I rang her doorbell and desperately hoped she would answer and I could then ask to come inside; but she didn’t. The group of guys saw me, and stood at the end of my driveway, continuing their taunting. I had no idea what they wanted, or what I should do. Luckily, they left shortly after. I went to my own house, where my roommate let me in.
Ladies, LISTEN TO YOUR GUT! It can prevent situations like this.

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A Week In Our Shoes: BUSY, BUSY REVOLUTIONARIES EDITION

This week was exciting for advocates everywhere!

The Violence Against Women Act (including LGBTQ-inclusive provisions) has passed this Senate! Remember when we went to the White House two weeks ago because they were concerned it wouldn’t? It did! Thanks for all your tweeting, petition signing, and phone calls to Senators: they worked! Next stop: the House.

Denim Day Press Conference

Wednesday Was Denim Day! This is an annual day of remembrance all over the world to increase awareness surrounding rape and sexual assault and on Tuesday I was at the press conference. On Wednesday Veronica gave a workshop in Brooklyn, and I headed out to Queens to give a workshop to two groups of middle and high schoolers.

Media BLITZ! We posted about it this week, but it’s worth mentioning again. This week was insane! Hollaback! was featured in countless publications and on several news channels including CNET, local news in Washington, CBS Good Morning, the Daily News and Fox to name a few. Check them all out here.

Scenarios USA Gala

Scenarios USA had their gala! Scenarios USA uses writing and film to amplify the voices of young people in conversations about young people’s sexuality and sexual health. I was honored to get to volunteer with one of their amazing young writers, Nancy Romero, during the cocktail hour.

Our Queens Safety Audit is coming! Councilmember Ferreras’s Legislative Director, Annie Meredith, Chief of Staff, Yoselin Genao, Natalie, and I took a walk around Queens in preparation for our upcoming safety audit. Already 60 people have RSVPed, thanks to local community partners. It takes place on Saturday May 5th, so RSVP today! You’ll get a free t-shirt and lunch.

We’re having a benefit show with Permanent Wave on May 15th — so mark your calendar. And do us a favor and invite all your friends. The revolution needs us all.

HOLLA and out —

Emily

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Thanks Hollaback! Ottawa For a Friday Chortle!

 

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