Month: February 2011

Remembering my first hollaback!

This happened a long time ago, but I remember it vividly because it was the very first time I hollaed back. I was 18 and living in Paris at the time, and as all Parisians, used the subway to get pretty much anywhere. I was coming back from a long cramming session at the university … Continued

Age is but a number.

I’m 40 damn years old. I thought by now I’d get a break from this crap. Went into supermarket the other day. At front door saw a man I sort of knew, he was at a booth selling phone plans. I recognized him as the husband of one of my husband’s associates, if that makes … Continued

Words & House Bill 14 in the State of Georgia.

What’s in a name? Words are powerful. They can educate and empower, express and encourage. Words can forge relationships and build bridges. But despite their awesome ability to strengthen, they can also dismantle and destroy when they’re used as weapons. Stick and stones can break your bones, but words will never hurt me? Tell that … Continued

The economic impact of workplace harassment

Among the reasons I am leaving my job is the sexual harassment. It makes me uncomfortable and angry. At the supermarket where I just finished my last day (thank god!) I am hit on in subtle and not-subtle ways, and have been since I started working there. The guys in produce stare at me whenever … Continued

“Your comment was an assertion of masculine power”

I was sitting at the end of a bench at the Steel Plaza T Station one evening. I had my bag by my side so no one could sit directly next to me. A man came up to the bench and instead of sitting farther down away from me, he stood directly next to me. … Continued

Study This!

Toronto’s Metropolitan Action Committee on Violence Against Women and Children (METRAC) has released the results of their study on how women do and do not respond to street harassment. 127 of you took part in the study and the results will be used to develop an app with phrases and resources for responding to harassment—look … Continued