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Anonymous’s Story: “He did not stop looking”

I’m sitting on the bus and I look up to see this older man stare at me. He did not stop looking until I zippered my jacket and covered my chest.

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Anonymous’s Story: No peace

After parking in a parking garage, I was walking down the street to get to my destination. I purposely crossed the street to avoid walking past a group of construction workers, even though I didn’t have to. I watched as they all leered at a young woman who had been in front of me before I crossed. She chose to just break out her phone and text to avoid eye contact. At this point my blood was already boiling a bit. When I got to the building I needed to enter, I had to cross the street again. A group of 3 guys whiplashed their necks to check out that same girl as she passed them. When they got to me, I saw smiles and stares from the corner of my eye and heard “C’mon, smile baby” just as we crossed paths. I kept walking, up to the door, but said “Shut the f**k up” real loud. His friend said something like “oooh, dang” and laughed that the street harasser wasn’t enough of a player or something, instead of oh, I don’t know: apologizing for his friend, telling his friend to shut up, laughing at how idiotic street harassment really is. It took a while to calm down. I KNEW that this other young woman, nor myself, could just walk down the street on warm, sunny day in peace.


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Stephanie’s Story: No, we would not like to have an orgy

I was walking with my sister and best friend in a slightly sketchy part of Albany and some guy asked us if we wanted to have an “orgy.” Gross!

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Anonymous’s Story: Gross Valentine’s Day

the driver of the silver car leaned out his window and made a loud juicy kissing noise at me before I crossed the street from under that bridge. Happy v day!

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Marie’s Story: Not my job to smile for you

I broke my arm. I was at the pharmacy waiting for my pain rx to be filled. A man approached me and said “smile gorgeous, how are you” I’m thinking, well, I’m clearly not too well considering my giant cast and sling. I’m in pain, do I seriously look like I want to talk to you? And why is it my job to smile FOR YOU anytime, much less when I’m in pain and clearly busy on my phone.

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Article, Stalking, Uncategorized

“Stalker is a Harsh Word, I Prefer Valentine”

BY CATHERINE FAVORITE

This year Target is selling one Valentine’s Day card that draws only the sound of crickets and tumbleweeds rather than laughter. The front of the card reads:

 

“Stalker is a harsh word” and the inside says: “I prefer Valentine”.

 

Considering that 54 percent of female murder victims reported being stalked, this is one crime that should never be equated with love.  Regardless of your feelings about Valentine’s Day, it should go without saying that there is never a good time to make light of stalking, especially not on a day that is supposed to be about letting the people in your life know you care about them. Apparently, Target has not gotten the memo, yet.

 

By making light of what is a serious, terrifying and potentially violent crime for 1 in 12 women and 1 in 45 men in the United States, Target is normalizing the message that stalking is acceptable behavior. Even worse, they are diminishing the concerns of victims of stalking and contributing to the dangerous attitude that one should not report it to the police. So Hollabackers, let’s call Target out on their insensitivity! By signing this Care2 petition, you will help send a message to Target that jokes about stalking are not edgy or humorous.

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Shawna’s Story: Courage to speak

My friend L. was walking to work and from behind she heard a guy say “Hey Sweetheart”. She kept walking and never saw the guy. She brought it up at work, obviously frustrated, but didn’t see the point in “making a big deal out of it” because she has to deal with it all the time. I think that is WHY we women have to deal with it all the time, because we force ourselves to bury it away and NEVER deal with it. The more people can know that objectifying or degrading comments make us feel like crap, then maybe it will happen less. Or maybe we can have the courage to speak out when it does happen. And yeah, even “Hey sweetheart” can make you feel weird when you don’t know the person saying it & they’re behind you and you haven’t seen their face and all you wanted to do was walk to work without being reminded that society views you as a piece of meat.

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Anonymous’s Story: Victory

I was walking to the train at 6am on a Sunday. A man passed me and made a comment. I was right by a deli an didn’t feel danger so I turned around and said, are you serious? I’m a woman alone, you’re a man alone, it’s 6am, it’s dark, just think about what you’re doing, just think.  He actually seemed to hear what I said, and he apologized! Victory.

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Anonymous’s Story: Poor example

I was walking to the metro when this male (not worthy of being called a man) walking with two small children said, “ain’t that sexy” to me as I walked by. I didn’t ask for his input, and it’s infuriating to be referred to as an object, “that”. I did feel empowered, however, to be able to pull out my phone and do something about it!

It makes me sad to think of the poor example that person is setting for those two small children. But I remain hopeful that with campaigns like Hollaback, we will one day end street harassment.

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Anonymous’s Story: True vulgarity

Me and my girlfriend were stopped at a red light when a man got out of his car yelling at us calling us stupid dykes and c**ts flipping us off saying f**k equality and he served in the military continuing to call us faggots. I let him know I have my two year old child in the car he  said he didn’t care and continued screaming vulgar names until light turned green.

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