The Movement

J’aime Olm is a #wisedam

J’aime Olm is amazing. She just won the techdisrupt competition with her idea on creating a “black box” for women’s safety. She also did something totally unheard of. She used her six minutes on stage to shout-out another start-up. You guessed it, Hollaback. She comes on stage at about minute four.

She has won our hearts. We’ll keep you posted when her app comes out.

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The Movement

GRRL-GANGS

WAH-NAILS in London runs HollabackLDN, and posted this on their blog this morning.  My favorite part? The “we are everyone, we are everywhere” banners on the sides.  With new Hollabacks popping up left and right, this isn’t just wishful thinking.

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The Movement

We’re hiring and we’re shaking it up!

As you know by now, HollabackNYC was developed in 2005 by a group of young adults. In 2010, I became executive director of Hollaback! and the project transformed from a series of local blogs into an international organization. Now, the Hollaback! is looking to hand the management of the NYC website to a group of ten 18-22 young women and LGBTQ individuals who are representative of New York City’s diversity in terms of race, socio-economic perspective, and educational background. The youth will receive six months of training, which will include everything from social media, to comment moderation, to event planning. At the end of the training, the youth will be integrated into Hollaback’s network and will be handed HollabackNYC to manage on their own.

We couldn’t be more excited about this transition. Please help us out by spreading the word about the HollabackNYC Program Director position (or applying yourself!).

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The Movement

Why I Hollaback: Emily’s story

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The Movement

Is Street Harassment Worse in France? Part III

This is written by Anna, who plans to start a Hollaback in France!

I’m very sorry for what happened to Sabriya. I’m a French woman who has lived one year in New York City. I don’t live in Paris, but I have to say that I’ve felt much more relax and safe during my staying in NYC that I had in my hometown. Maybe NYC is such a huge city that everyone is more or less anonymous: no one really cares about how the others are dressed, or how they behave. You don’t have time to look at a stranger who looks unusual in the street and wonder “what do I think about this?” At least, it is the feeling I had.

I don’t want to talk about a cultural difference between our countries as street harassment exists everywhere around the world. I’ve been street harassed in NYC a few times. Two men gave me the “Hey cutie”, others the kissing noise, one put his hand into his pant and smiled when I walked by him, a truck driver honked at me and my girls friends, and, the most disgusting, a man masturbated in front of me in Coney Island.

From my experience, street harassment in France is more intrusive and happens more often. I mean men often come closer, engage a conversation with you. And they stay, they don’t just pass by.

Unfortunately, I have very little information on street harassment in France, we actually don’t even use the terms “street harassment”! The newspapers articles that I found treated it as a game or as a form of flirting. As for the forums/websites, they’re often full of racist comments. That’s one of the reasons I decided to start a Hollaback France. Here are the links of two articles (here and here) written by sociologists (in French) about violence in public spaces and women’s fears.

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The Movement

Hollaback Pittsburgh is here!

We are proud to welcome HollabackPGH to the scene! HollabackPGH is run by two smart, energetic, and dynamic organizers. In their introductory post they wrote:

“We hope that one day, everyone will be free from street harassment, whether it stems from your gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else. We dream of a world where people don’t have to worry that others will harass them based on their appearance or identity when they’re just trying to get to work or to a party, and where everyone feels safe to walk alone and take public transportation without hearing phrases like “Hey baby, nice ass,” or experiencing the horror of being followed home or groped. We want to be a part of a movement that says that this is NOT OK, and we hope that HollabackPGH! can serve as a rallying point to fight back!”

Let your friends in Pittsburgh know, it’s time to stop walking on and start holla’ing back!

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The Movement

Why I Hollaback: Ellie’s story

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