The Movement

Domestic Violence and Street Harassment

The first Annual Westside Domestic Violence Walk will take place on Thursday, October 28th from 10:30am to 1pm, in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. According to the organizers, “This walk is to educate and raise awareness in the community about the issue of domestic violence and to join other advocates, treatment providers, survivors and community members in solidarity against domestic violence and its devastating impact on individuals, society and our healthcare system. We will gather in front of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine on Amsterdam Avenue and 112th Street at 10:30 am for a rally before the one mile walk down to 100th Street on Amsterdam Avenue, turning to Broadway and back up to the Cathedral where there will be speakers and refreshments.”

As we well know, all forms of sexual violence work together to create a world that is not-so-nice to women and LBGTQ folks. At the national sexual assault conference this year, I had the opportunity to meet with a woman who was at the head of the domestic violence movement when it started.  She said it was started by a bunch of survivors, in a living room, with little more than some telephones and a lot of passion.  This woman went for six years without being paid. Only forty years later, there is a notable infrastructure for survivors of domestic violence around the country.

I told her I thought the movement to end street harassment was blessed.  The support was overwhelming, and although we didn’t have any money, we had a lot of passion in living rooms across the world. She said that’s all it takes.  She said we were doing the right thing by coming forward and telling our stories; that’s where it all starts.  I smiled, humbled.  We wouldn’t be doing this work if women like her didn’t come before us.  Hats off to her, and hats off to the Domestic Violence walk for continuing to build a world where everyone can be safe and free.

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The Movement

Introducing… Hollaback SAN JOSE!

We are proud to announce the newest of the Hollaback sites: Hollaback San Jose!

They write on their blog, “After years of being yelled at, whistled at, of having our space invaded, of being made to feel that we walk the streets at our own peril, we are ready to assert our right to feel safe, sexy and confident in public.  It happens to all of us, and we’ve learned to drown it out. We’re told to ignore it, to keep walking– but that is exactly why it keeps happening.”

We’ll keep you posted on the incredible work that San Jose is up to.  In the meantime, if you live in the San Jose area, HOLLABACK! You can email it to: hollabacksanjose@gmail.com.

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The Movement

J’aime Olm is a #wisedam

J’aime Olm is amazing. She just won the techdisrupt competition with her idea on creating a “black box” for women’s safety. She also did something totally unheard of. She used her six minutes on stage to shout-out another start-up. You guessed it, Hollaback. She comes on stage at about minute four.

She has won our hearts. We’ll keep you posted when her app comes out.

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The Movement

GRRL-GANGS

WAH-NAILS in London runs HollabackLDN, and posted this on their blog this morning.  My favorite part? The “we are everyone, we are everywhere” banners on the sides.  With new Hollabacks popping up left and right, this isn’t just wishful thinking.

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The Movement

We’re hiring and we’re shaking it up!

As you know by now, HollabackNYC was developed in 2005 by a group of young adults. In 2010, I became executive director of Hollaback! and the project transformed from a series of local blogs into an international organization. Now, the Hollaback! is looking to hand the management of the NYC website to a group of ten 18-22 young women and LGBTQ individuals who are representative of New York City’s diversity in terms of race, socio-economic perspective, and educational background. The youth will receive six months of training, which will include everything from social media, to comment moderation, to event planning. At the end of the training, the youth will be integrated into Hollaback’s network and will be handed HollabackNYC to manage on their own.

We couldn’t be more excited about this transition. Please help us out by spreading the word about the HollabackNYC Program Director position (or applying yourself!).

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The Movement

Why I Hollaback: Emily’s story

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The Movement

Is Street Harassment Worse in France? Part III

This is written by Anna, who plans to start a Hollaback in France!

I’m very sorry for what happened to Sabriya. I’m a French woman who has lived one year in New York City. I don’t live in Paris, but I have to say that I’ve felt much more relax and safe during my staying in NYC that I had in my hometown. Maybe NYC is such a huge city that everyone is more or less anonymous: no one really cares about how the others are dressed, or how they behave. You don’t have time to look at a stranger who looks unusual in the street and wonder “what do I think about this?” At least, it is the feeling I had.

I don’t want to talk about a cultural difference between our countries as street harassment exists everywhere around the world. I’ve been street harassed in NYC a few times. Two men gave me the “Hey cutie”, others the kissing noise, one put his hand into his pant and smiled when I walked by him, a truck driver honked at me and my girls friends, and, the most disgusting, a man masturbated in front of me in Coney Island.

From my experience, street harassment in France is more intrusive and happens more often. I mean men often come closer, engage a conversation with you. And they stay, they don’t just pass by.

Unfortunately, I have very little information on street harassment in France, we actually don’t even use the terms “street harassment”! The newspapers articles that I found treated it as a game or as a form of flirting. As for the forums/websites, they’re often full of racist comments. That’s one of the reasons I decided to start a Hollaback France. Here are the links of two articles (here and here) written by sociologists (in French) about violence in public spaces and women’s fears.

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