The Movement

Badass Blogger Call

Hollaback embodies all that is strong, powerful, and badass about being a woman today, and reflects a global female solidarity that knows no racial, age, or geographic boundaries. As such, we seek three men or women who can represent and illustrate these values in written form.

Selected writers need to be able to commit to blogging a minimum of twice per week about key stories and milestones in the anti-harassment movement in a voice that is bold and street harassment savvy.

Interested candidates should submit a sample piece for publication by February 10, 2011 on a topic that you feel is important, timely, and of interest to Hollaback readers. Accompanying your piece should be a brief description of you, why the anti-harassment movement is important to you, and how you represent a unique voice.

Bloggers will be selected for diversity of voice and quality of writing and can hail from anywhere in the world. To submit your sample piece and accompanying information, please email everything in the body of an email to violet@ihollaback.org

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The Movement

HOLLAwho? Meet Atlanta.

Meet Crystal Rodgers, the Feminista Barista fighting street harassment in Atlanta.

What’s your craft? Women’s Studies, professional student, and barista

HOLLAfact about your city: Atlanta wasn’t always the state capital, it used to be Milledgeville.  Also, the World Barista Championship was held in Atlanta in April of 2010!

My superheroine power is … I like to call myself Feminista Barista!  I fight sexist oppression while simultaneously pulling a tasty shot of espresso-all with my mind!

Say you’re Queen for the day.  What would you do to end street harassment? As queen for a day, do I get to use my superpower?  If so, I would erase everyone’s memories of patriarchal ideology (and other oppressive belief systems for that matter) perpetuating acts of misogynistic violence!

Why do you HOLLA?: Because it’s an effective, non-violent, and powerful way to combat street harassment!  As well as providing an opportunity to connect with my community (and others across the globe)!

Define your style: I like vintage stuff-currently donning my 50′s style cat-eye frames.  I love tattoos and plan on adding to my collection soon-my favorite tatt is currently an aviator pin-up girl I had completed over the summer! I have an asymmetrical haircut.  And….high waisted pants and thrift store sweaters are currently my jam.  :)

What do you collect? Tattoos, unique coffee brewing devices, and feminist reading materials

If you could leave the world one piece of advice, what would it be? Don’t remain complacent with the current state of things.  We do not live in a post-feminist society and it is imperative that we work together against oppressive ideologies and institutions-including taking responsibility for our personal internalization of racist, classist, sexist, ableist, and homophobic belief systems.

In the year 2020, street harassment … will be non-existent!

Random: I think I would have enjoyed being a twenty-something in the 20s, late 70s, and early 90s.  I am obsessed with female vocalists-Kate Bush is currently my favorite!  I was the 2nd place Southeast regional barista champion in 2009!

Follow Hollaback Atlanta on Twitter.

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The Movement

Man calls out street harassers with spoken word

Now that’s what we’re talking about!  This movement just keeps getting better and better.

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The Movement

2010: One Hollava Year!

Holy cow. We knew it was a big year for anti-harassment successes but had no idea just how big until seeing it all written down in one place. Holly Kearl of Stop Street Harassment has compiled a recap of some of the year’s most important and fascinating stories and accomplishments, including highlights of women standing up to their harassers as submitted to her blog.

She remembers Lisa Robinson, the Welsh woman who stood on the train tracks so that her apathetic conductor was forced to call the police after she was verbally abused in front of her husband and 5-year old son throughout her ride by a group of drunken sports fans.

And she recalls that itty bitty accomplishment, the street harassment city council meeting (!), that the movement earned in October.

Congratulations, ladies, to you and to all of our male friends who have taken a stand—your hollabacks have propelled all of this. When you hollaback, your courage and your solidarity show other women in your city and around the world that it can be done, and how they can do it. When you report your harasser, it makes it that much easier for the next woman or child to report and identify her harasser. So hollaback in 2011 and pay it forward.

Here’s to even greater successes in the new year and to thousands more hollabacks from YOU.

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The Movement

Sexism on Yelp?

Sexism on yelp? When I logged into my account, this was enough to make me think that some of the comments may not be random.

I don’t want to sound crazy, but here is what I saw (screenshot included) When I logged into my account on yelp, I saw the banner overhead greeting me with a very personal and creepy message, “Looking good, Raven.” Somehow, it struck me. I did not understand why at the time, but this next message confirmed it: When I clicked to go to my profile, I was greeted with what you see below. Now, pretty is not an adjective that would be used to describe a man. I can’t help but think that the selection process for greetings at yelp isn’t as arbitrary as people would think and that you’re privacy may not be as protected. Even in the world of online, as a woman, you want to be valued for yourself as a complex human being and not appraised as a sex object with no right and/or feelings. I can’t help but feel that something – and I am highly intuitive – is not right with this. I have contacted management and I am looking forward to seeing what they have to say. I’ll keep you informed.

Submitted by Raven.

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The Movement

Happy HOLLAdays!

Wishing you and yours the merriest of Christmas and the happiest of HOLLAdays.

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campaign, The Movement

Government sponsored anti-sexual assault initiative? Now that’s what we’re talkin’ about

Wales’ government sponsored campaign at ending a rape culture of victim-blaming scores extra points this week from Hollaback. Stop Blame defines sexual assault as “unwanted sexual behaviour directed towards another person that causes humiliation, pain, fear, shame, intimidation or mental suffering,” and asks us to stop handing perpetrators the excuses they need to justify their actions:

“The rapist and society use the same, tired old excuses, time and time again-she was promiscuous, she was drunk, her skirt was so VERY short. She was asking for it.

Well here’s news – No matter how short her skirt or whether she put up a physical fight – No woman, or any of her actions, is responsible for being raped or sexually assaulted. No woman is EVER asking for it.”

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campaign, Street harassment in the media, The Movement

India and Korea release harassment numbers, revealing problem’s pandemic proportions

Two new studies came out this week, solidifying growing global anti-harassment sentiment and activism as forces to be reckoned with. Studies cross-posted from Holly Kearl at Stop Street Harassment:

#1: In a study of 828 salaried employees in an unnamed city in Korea, 43 percent said they experienced sexual harassment during their commute, and 79 percent were women. Via The Korean Times:

“Nearly 72 percent of the incidents occurred on subway cars, followed by buses at 27.3 percent and taxis at 1.1 percent. Nearly 60 percent said they experienced harassment between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. when most workers are on their way to work, while 17 percent were between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. while returning home from work.

About 61.9 percent said at the time of the sexual harassment, it was too crowded for them to move within the subway train or bus. In response to the harassment, 43.2 percent said they did nothing about it, and 25 percent moved to a different place. Only 18.2 percent strongly protested against the assailants and 6.3 percent shouted in anger.”

#2: In the state capitol of Thiruvananthapurm in the south Indian state Keralaas, 1000 women were recently interviewed about street harassment. Ninety-eight percent said they had experienced it and 90 percent said the harassment was either physically or vocally violent. The harassment was notable on public transportation and 62 percent had experienced it there. Only seven percent had reported any of their experiences of harassment.

India’s study was sponsored in part by UNIFEM, Jagori, and Sakhi Resources Center.

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campaign, The Movement

Shout and shut down that perv! Tips from Nicola Badass Briggs

As if she couldn’t get any cooler, here is Nicola Briggs on camera for Jezebel with tips and tricks for fending off those creeps. Oh yes. Oh fucking yes.

Nicola Badass Briggs talks to Jezebel here.

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