demonstration, event

100 Thousand Poets for Change

Have a way with words? Want to change the world? 100 Thousand Poets for Change is an upcoming international event that celebrates poetry and advocates social, political and environmental change.

Currently, 350 cities representing 70 counties are all planning their own public events, focusing on different topics that reflect local issues. The events will all take place at the same time on September 24 and will be documented through a blog.

AtréveteDF, the Hollaback! chapter in Mexico City, is getting involved and currently accepting poem submissions on sexual harassment and discrimination in public spaces as part of the worldwide event. They will publish these on their site and use them in public action. AtréveteDF is also partnering with the collective Contra La Violencia, El Arte (Against Violence, Art). The deadline to submit is September 5.

Want to start your own event? You can find more information on the 100 Thousand Poets for Change website and Facebook page.

no comments 
event

March 20th is International Anti-Street Harassment Day

The Hollaback Houston team will be creating a video to illustrate how street harassment is NOT a compliment – by capturing phone video footage (Hollaback! style) of street harassment victims using real comments that were used on them by harassers. These will then be edited together and contrasted with co-directors reading real comments from the internet talking about how it IS a compliment.

Please let the Houston team know if you are interested in participating! This is not limited to March 20 or Houston – contact Hollaback Houston any time before then, and if you can, even make your own clip and just send it to us [email protected].

On March 20 at noon, Hollaback Houston will have a small event at Market Square Park in downtown Houston to do some videos and talk about street harassment. Just look for representatives at the tables in front of the Niko Nikos stand!

You can also RSVP on our Facebook Event: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=203926396299935

no comments 
event, The Movement

Hollaback! by the Hundreds Effort Salutes International Women’s Day 2011

Dear Hollaback Community,

In honor of the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day please help us celebrate to make this the loudest and proudest Women’s Day the globe has yet seen!

Today we are collecting 100 stories for 100 years of incredible progress! Our local leaders have put together this special video valentine especially for you, to thank you for all of your hard work and dedication to helping make the world a safer place for women and LGBTQ individuals everywhere.

If you’ve never hollabacked, never has there been a better day than today. And if you’ve shared your stories with us before, share another. Put fingers to keypad and share that one story you still haven’t told that might help another girl find her own way to hollaback tomorrow.

And most importantly, thank you for all that you do!

Here’s to the biggest, greatest International Women’s Day yet!

With love and revolution,
Hollaback!

no comments 
event, rape, The Movement

Rape New York: A Series of Public Dialogues

After being raped at gunpoint in her Harlem apartment in 2001, Jana Leo resolved to fight back not only against the rapist but against the landlord whose greed and calculated recklessness set the stage for the break-in.  Encountering police disinterest, a health care system that refused to pay for a rape kit, and a beleaguered district attorney’s office, Leo sought justice for the violence of the attack, an experience that has resonated throughout her life.

The Feminist Press, along with Center for the Humanities at CUNY, RightRides, and Hollaback!, is sponsoring a series of dialogues to commemorate artist, philosopher, and architecture scholar Jana Leo’s forthcoming book Rape New York (Feminist Press, February 2011). Jana will be joined by writer and curator Gavin Browning, feminist writer and organizer Jennifer Baumgardner, architect and SUPERFRONT founder Mitch McEwen, and Michelle Anderson, Dean of CUNY Law School.

Join Hollaback! in Fort Greene on Monday, February 21 for the third discussion of the series.

Monday, February 21: Greenlight Bookstore, Fort Greene, Brooklyn, 7:30 pm
Violent Crime & the Urban Landscape with Mitch McEwen

Click here for a full calendar of events.

no comments 
event, The Movement

Sex Crimes Against Black Girls exhibit will open at Skylight Gallery

Sexual exploitation stemmed in gender oppression is a phenomenon that is generally hidden under a blanket of reticence due to the challenge of addressing issues of sexism under a larger context of racism.

Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration will open Sex Crimes Against Black Girls, a multimedia exhibit curated by Shantrelle P. Lewis and featuring the works of Nyoka Acevedo, Kimberly Kimabe Becoat, Frances Bradley, Delphine Fawundu Buford, Tracee Worley, Numa Perrier, Wahala Temi, Noelle Lorraine Williams, that investigates the various levels of sexual exploitation and oppression that are suffered by young Black girls across the African Diaspora.

February 5 – April 2

Skylight Gallery, 3rd Floor | 1368 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY 11216 | 718.636.6949 | www.restorationplaza.org

2 comments 
event

Hollaback inspiration Nicola Briggs is getting an award for her actions

Badass subway hero Nicola Briggs is being given an award for standing up to her predator on December 16th.  Briggs will receive the first “Shero” from the Professional Women of Westchester and a diamond peace sign necklace from D’Errico’s Jewelry at D’Errico Jewelry’s 25th Anniversary Celebration.  Richard D’Errico, co-founder of the store, was impressed with Briggs’s bravery and wants to honor her at the celebration. Briggs, a martial arts and Tai Chi instructor in Bronxville, NY, says, “No one should feel ashamed when they are targeted by a sexual predator. The experience of shame needs to be placed squarely on the shoulders of the perpetrator, where it belongs.”  Everyone is welcome to attend.  The event will take place at D’Errico’s 25th Anniversary Celebration tomorrow, December 16 at 6PM at their 509 Central Avenue log cabin store in Scarsdale, NY.  So, please come out and help celebrate Nicola Briggs’s victory in the fight against street harassment!

For more information, call Tony Seideman at 914-737-8776, or e-mail [email protected].

no comments 
event, Street harassment in the media, The Webinar Series

Demystifying the OpEd

Learn more about our featured presenters: Elizabeth Méndez Berry + Holly Kearl

Email [email protected] to register.

no comments 
event, The Movement

NOW-NYC Rally to Take Rape Seriously, and secure justice for 3 teen girls

Reprinted from NOW-NYC.  For more information, click here.

Tuesday, November 9th, 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
111 Centre Street, NYC (between Leonard & White;
6, Q, N, R, J, Z to Canal St.)

WHY THIS RALLY IS IMPORTANT:
NOW-NYC and anti-violence advocates from across the city are joining forces to ask Justice Cassandra Mullen to give confessed rapist, Tony Simmons, a sentence with jail time.  Recently, the Manhattan Supreme Court Justice proposed a sentence of ten years probation with absolutely no jail time for this court-appointed juvenile counselor who pled guilty to raping one girl and sexually assaulting two others.

If Simmons, who admitted to sexually assaulting three teen girls, can get off without any jail time, what does that mean for women victims of rape across the city?  We need to send a message to Justice Mullen, law enforcement, our leaders, and our community to Take Rape Seriously!


WHAT YOU CAN DO:
1)  Join our rally and press conference on Tuesday, November 9th 12:30 pm and help us send a strong message!  We’ll have signs available, or you can bring your own. Our key messages are: (a) Take Rape Seriously
(b) NO Getting Away With Rape  (c) Simmons Should Serve

2)  Sign Our Petition NOW to Justice Cassandra Mullen to demand jail time for this violent offender and justice for the victims. We will present our petition to Justice Mullen after the rally.

3) Get more signers on this petition. Send out the link to the petition widely. Forward to friends, bloggers, and post on Facebook and Twitter. URL: http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/now-nyc_justiceforassaultvictims/

Street harassment is a gateway crime that creates a culture of violence against women. Sexual harassment and aggression have no place in our homes, our jobs, our classes, our streets. Show your support today, with $5.

2 comments 
event

Hollaback!: Feminist Responses to Street Harassment panel at Barnard!

Please join us as we talk about the revolution at Barnard on Monday, October 25th at 6:30pm!

Speakers include: Emily May from Hollaback!, Shannon Lynberg and Chai Shenoy from HollabackDC, and Oraia Reid from RightRides.

Here’s the description: Street harassment, or sexual harassment in public spaces, is an issue with which just about every woman has some experience. Activists from New York City and Washington, DC will discuss new, innovative ways to combat street harassment using technology, mapping, and community organizing. Through online activism, public policy and advocacy, and outreach, these activists have succeeded in giving people from many different communities a forum in which they can speak out against gender-based street harassment.

For more details, click on the facebook invite here. Spread the word by inviting your friends.

See you there!

one comment 
event, NYPD FAIL, public masturbation, Stalking

Jerk-off caught in the act and then not charged because of "lack of evidence." Gross on so many levels.

It happened a few years ago while I was in college. I was working as a waitress at a busy restaurant/bar in town and would usually get home around 1:30 am. One night I came home at the usual time, took a shower and went to bed. The next morning I find a business card stuck to my door from a local police officer asking me to contact him ASAP. I called the precinct, and he tells me that a man was arrested the night before for masturbating outside of my window. Apparently, some people at a party in the next building saw him from their balcony and called the police. I was listening to my iPod when I went to bed, so I never heard the cops knock on my door.

Incidentally, I always have my curtains closed, but apparently there was an opening at the bottom where they overlapped (about the size of a quarter, according to the cops who were at the scene), so he could see into my bedroom through this limited space. As the officer is telling me this, I realize that this man saw me completely naked after my shower the night before and watched me rub lotion all over myself, too, so apparently he got quite a show.

The officer tells me the guy’s name and asks if I know him. He says that the day before this “peeping” incident the man had been released from prison where he had been serving time for a sex crime. I don’t recognize the man’s name or description, but now I am panicking. This perv knows where I live, where I work (due to my waitress uniform), what kind of car I drive, and he can probably guess that at the end of the night I come home with an apron full of cash…plus he’s a convicted sex offender. I ask the officer if I can see the guy’s mug shot, to see if I recognize him from the restaurant, and so I will know who he is if I see him anywhere near me, and he says no, that he’s not allowed to show me a photo because it would be a violation of the guy’s rights! So this guy can look at my fully naked body without my knowledge or consent, but I can’t look at his face after he’s been arrested for peeping and wanking outside of my window. So glad that his rights weren’t violated!

I seriously feared for my safety after that. I felt so exposed, and not just because he had seen me naked, but because I felt that I was denied the option to protect myself. This guy was a convicted criminal with a history of sexually assaulting women! I hated not knowing if he was out there following me or watching me again– maybe I had even unknowingly waited on him? I never spent another night at that apartment and moved three weeks later. I also never heard back from the police about the case. When I called to follow up, I was told that the charges had been dropped due to a lack of “evidence”, meaning that he had not left a DNA sample at the scene. He had been interrupted by the police approaching and so he never finished, and apparently the statements from my neighbors weren’t proof enough of his crime. I hope with all my heart that I was the last woman he violated, but somehow I doubt it.

Submitted by Anne

no comments 
Page 1 of 212»
Powered by WordPress