campaign, The Movement

Government sponsored anti-sexual assault initiative? Now that’s what we’re talkin’ about

Wales’ government sponsored campaign at ending a rape culture of victim-blaming scores extra points this week from Hollaback. Stop Blame defines sexual assault as “unwanted sexual behaviour directed towards another person that causes humiliation, pain, fear, shame, intimidation or mental suffering,” and asks us to stop handing perpetrators the excuses they need to justify their actions:

“The rapist and society use the same, tired old excuses, time and time again-she was promiscuous, she was drunk, her skirt was so VERY short. She was asking for it.

Well here’s news – No matter how short her skirt or whether she put up a physical fight – No woman, or any of her actions, is responsible for being raped or sexually assaulted. No woman is EVER asking for it.”

no comments 
campaign, Street harassment in the media, The Movement

India and Korea release harassment numbers, revealing problem’s pandemic proportions

Two new studies came out this week, solidifying growing global anti-harassment sentiment and activism as forces to be reckoned with. Studies cross-posted from Holly Kearl at Stop Street Harassment:

#1: In a study of 828 salaried employees in an unnamed city in Korea, 43 percent said they experienced sexual harassment during their commute, and 79 percent were women. Via The Korean Times:

“Nearly 72 percent of the incidents occurred on subway cars, followed by buses at 27.3 percent and taxis at 1.1 percent. Nearly 60 percent said they experienced harassment between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. when most workers are on their way to work, while 17 percent were between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. while returning home from work.

About 61.9 percent said at the time of the sexual harassment, it was too crowded for them to move within the subway train or bus. In response to the harassment, 43.2 percent said they did nothing about it, and 25 percent moved to a different place. Only 18.2 percent strongly protested against the assailants and 6.3 percent shouted in anger.”

#2: In the state capitol of Thiruvananthapurm in the south Indian state Keralaas, 1000 women were recently interviewed about street harassment. Ninety-eight percent said they had experienced it and 90 percent said the harassment was either physically or vocally violent. The harassment was notable on public transportation and 62 percent had experienced it there. Only seven percent had reported any of their experiences of harassment.

India’s study was sponsored in part by UNIFEM, Jagori, and Sakhi Resources Center.

no comments 
campaign, The Movement

Shout and shut down that perv! Tips from Nicola Badass Briggs

As if she couldn’t get any cooler, here is Nicola Briggs on camera for Jezebel with tips and tricks for fending off those creeps. Oh yes. Oh fucking yes.

Nicola Badass Briggs talks to Jezebel here.

no comments 
campaign, Street harassment in the media, The Movement

Reporting platform for sexual harassment launches in Egypt

HarassMap officially announced the release of their SMS text reporting platform yesterday that will allow any cellphone user to report harassment and assault by sending a simple text message. This brings to 2 the number of anti-harassment initiatives launched in the middle east that we’ve written about in the past week. This is the fun part of the job.

HarassMap’s model is unique in that any cell phone user may participate, and not just those with iPhones or Droids. This means that replications in other cities around the world could soon be on their way, paving the way for continued success against public sexual abuse.

Reports are already being accepted . To report by SMS text, send details to 0169870900. To send a report by email, send to [email protected], or you can connect with the group via Facebook and Twitter as well. Visit the HarassMap site in English here.

Congratulations, HarassMap team, and THANK YOU for all that you do.

2 comments 
campaign, The Movement

Jordanian anti-harassment initiative launches!

Anti-harassment sentiment is heating up all over the world, and our latest good news comes from the middle east, where a Jordanian grassroots campaign called objecDEFY Harassment has launched with a bang!

With their own YouTube channel and a whole host of PSAs in both English and Arabic featuring unsavory characters and snarky captions like “Seriously. You’re going to let these idiots ruin your life?” and calling for women to take action, we couldn’t be more excited.

Watch one PSA here.

one comment 
campaign, The Movement

Want to help stop rape culture and create real change on your campus? Here’s how:

Policy reform is a way in which rape culture is confronted, whether from within the federal government or on campus. Students Active For Ending Rape (SAFER) is asking students around the U.S. to step up to the challenge by submitting your school to their database for a review of its current campus sexual assault policies. If your school does not currently maintain one such policy, SAFER wants to help you create one. If it does maintain a policy, you may be surprised to read what’s included…

Log in to find your school in the Campus Accountability Project’s database and watch this video to find out how to help create a community where rape culture is not promoted or tolerated in any way, shape, or form—engage your school in the discussion and help create lasting positive change for yourself and your classmates!

one comment 
campaign, Street harassment in the media, The Movement

The Harasser, The Toad, And The Goddesses’ Daughter: A Tale For Women | by Erik Kondo

Satire can be a powerful artistic form used to change bad human behavior.

It uses irony, wit, and ridicule to attack human vice, folly, and foolishness.

“As such, it is a tool that can be used to defeat street harassment,” writes blogger and self-defense guru Erik Kondo.

“Satire can be used to deny and refute the power of street harassers and expose their weaknesses and flaws. I came up with the term ‘sexless toad’ because as a man, I believe it is an insult that takes away power and is emasculating. The point is to come up with words that take away power. The insult ‘asshole’ actually gives power.”

Click here to read the tale of The Harasser, The Toad, And The Goddesses’ Daughter.

no comments 
campaign, demonstration, event, union square

"Hot Pussy is No Way to Say Hello" campaign premieres in Union Square


“It is not my problem or my responsibility to prevent men from assaulting me”

 

 

Teamed up with fellow NYC activist and student, Sarah VanDenbergh, I had an awesome time representing HollabackNYC at the world premiere of the “Hot Pussy is No Way to Say Hello” campaign in Union Square on April 3.

 

After moving from a small town to NYC for graduate school at NYU, Sarah was quickly disgusted by the amount and degree of street harassment she received when she stepped out her front door. Appalled by the common misconception that street harassment is sometimes provoked or asked for by the woman and that the woman is responsible for preventing her own assault, Sarah’s thesis puts the offending men and their bad behavior under the spotlight, in a reversal of roles.

“Most of the research, discourse, media, and news coverage around sexual harassment discusses it through an individual framework focusing on the victim. The solution that that framework leads to is the victim helping herself. There is very little to do with the male. It is not my problem or my responsibility to prevent men from assaulting me. It is a man’s problem and a man’s responsibility. It was therefore the goal of my project to change a “woman’s problem” into a public prerogative.”

 

Seven life-sized cardboard cutouts of male silhouettes were placed standing up in Union Square, each with a different sign on his chest: “I grope women on the train almost every day,” “I masturbate on women on the L train,” “I objectify women’s bodies.” Two black boxes were placed at the foot of two figures that played 108 looped recordings of lewd, derogatory, and offensive comments made to women taken directly from the Hollaback website. For this part, Sarah had several of her male friends record the phrases. They included such Hollaback classics as “Hey bitch! You want a stick or a dick?” and “Which one of you am I going to rape first?” and were played loudly for passersby to hear. We handed out postcards with the campaign motto that encourage women to take a photo of their harasser and submit it to Hollaback. 


Responses were mixed; surprisingly, the overwhelming majority were positive. One girl, who appeared on the verge of tears, said “Your work here is pretty hard to swallow, but it’s effective.” Others weren’t so supportive; one man said he liked what we were doing, but that the comments being projected from the recordings were “harsh”. Our response? “YEAH, THEY ARE. That’s why we’re here.”

For more information or to learn how you can hold this event in your neighborhood, please contact us.

VK

no comments 
Page 2 of 2«12
Powered by WordPress