Hollaback! Istanbul In Time Out Istanbul

Time out Istanbul


It is so wonderful to see that the Hollaback! global phenomenon is hitting headlines all over the world. Last week it was Hollaback! Chennai featured in The Times India and this week Hollaback! Istanbul has made it into Time Out Instanbul.

So congratulations Istanbul for giving women and LGBTQ individuals a platform to share their street harassment stories and the right to feel safe and confident on the streets of Turkey without fear of harassment or objectification. And thank you Hollaback! Istanbul for sparking a national conversation on street harassment in Turkey.

To read the full article click here.

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Black is Beautiful

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Black is Beautiful movement, the Black and Latino Film Coalition has created the Black is Beautiful project, a documentary and Public Service Announcement that reflects the beauty opinions of 100 Black and Latina women. Take a look at the teaser here:

Black is Beautiful Documentary Promo Video from BLFC on Vimeo.

The documentary maker’s vision for the project is that the film will be viewed by hundreds of students each of whom can connect with an onscreen person that looks like they do or looks like a friend or relative. Viewers will witness and engage in the “active celebration of strength, power and beauty of being a woman of color.”

But in order to make this a success the Black and Latino Film Coalition needs your help! For too long the media has projected a very narrow set of guidelines that stipulate what it is to be beautiful, so help us show the world that beauty is a multi-faceted concept that spans culture and ethnicity. To help bring Black is Beautiful to high schools, colleges and beyond visit their fundraising campaign on Indiegogo and make a donation today!

In order to bring this message to high schools, colleges and beyond, the Black Is Beautiful Project needs your help! Visit their fundraising campaign on Indiegogo, read their mission and make a donation. Be sure to tell a friend to tell a friend.

OR if you want to be a part of this exclusive cohort of beautiful women of color then submit your headshot, a small bio and a paragraph on “Why Black is Beautiful?” [email protected].

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A Week in Our Shoes: 1/27/12

The HOLLAteam before the MEN show!


Greetings Hollaback supporters and revolutionaries!

Check out this week ‘s HOLLAnews and updates with our latest installment of A Week in Our Shoes:

Out and about! International Movement Coordinator, Veronica Pinto, our new Movement Building Intern, Natalie Richman, myself, and our three super-supportive partners attended the MEN concert presented by our partners Permanent Wave. We got to meet the revolutionary JD Sampson (swoon) and I got to speak about our work to end street harassment.  Also, board member and founder of Mama’s Hip Hop kitchen, Kathleen Adams, is representing Hollaback! at a charity event Masquerade Noir Birthday Bash for DJ Mary Mac and LiKWUiD presented by pretty|UGLY NYC at the Silhouette Lounge in the Bronx this Saturday. On a more serious note, I also attended the Manhattan Borough President’s Domestic Violence Task Force this week and learned more about their work to address forced childhood marriages.

Engaging Legislators! Natalie Richman, our new intern, is busy printing maps that we will use to show local legislators here in NYC where street harassment is happening in their district. We’ll be setting up meetings with legislators, and with any luck, holding the second annual city council street harassment hearing this spring!

Help needed! We’ve now got a fancy new donor database called Salesforce. This may sound boring to you, but to us it’s very exciting! But we need some help figuring out how to use it.  Check here for a pro-bono job descriptions of what we’re looking for — and let us know if you’re able to help or if you know anyone who is.

Thanks Hollaback! supporters for another fantastic week of fighting street harassment and keeping the revolution alive!

HOLLA and out!




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Increase in Rape Reports in India Suggest Women Have Found Their Voice


Last weekend The Times of India reported that the number of cases of rape, molestation and harassment registered with the Madhya Pradesh State Women’s Commission more than doubled last year, compared to previous years.

The number of rape cases registered with the Commission jumped from 62 between 2009-2010, to 141 between 2010-2011. Workplace harassment cases grew as well from 115 in 2009, to 268 between 2010-2011.

While this sharp increase in gender-based crimes is indeed alarming, Rashmi Sarawat, chief executive officer, Mahila Chetna Manch, offered some perspective and a slight silver lining to these statistics:

“At the same time, growing awareness levels helped more women shed their social stigma and come out in the open. More women are now aware of the Domestic Violence Act and Vishakha guidelines issued by the Supreme Court for workplace harassment. This may be the prime reason for more number of cases related to violence against women coming to light.”

It may not be easy to confront the real numbers of rape, domestic abuse and harassment survivors (in the United States, a recently revealed figure that one in four women will be raped in their lifetime has caused some commotion). Yet, the large figures not only mean that more survivors are beginning to feel safe enough to come forward, but that the public must pay attention to the crimes that all too often go unaddressed or are swept aside. With more attention paid to these numbers, comes more public outrage. This is the first step to stronger laws (or better enforcement of these laws) protecting women as human beings in both the public and private sphere.

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HOLLAWho? Conocer Puerto Rico.

Meet Katsí Yarí Rodríguez, the fiery activist fighting street harassment in Puerto Rico.

Why do you HOLLA? Porque mi cuerpo necesitaba hablar de este tipo de situaciones como parte de un proceso de sanación y reconciliación. La memoria que mi cuerpo ha ido generando a partir de estas situaciones de acoso ha limitado mi manera de transitar en confianza en la ciudad y para sanar tenia que hablar.

What’s your craft? La investigación cultural con un enfoque de género y violencia. Creo que es urgente pensar la violencia rompiendo con algunos prejuicios y categorías que limitan nuestro alcance ante la complejidad de lo vivido.

What was your first experience with street harassment? Creo que a los 12 años. De hecho una de las cosas que más me impresiona sobre este tipo de situaciones de acoso es la manera tan detallada en que el cuerpo recuerda. Recuerdo la ropa que llevaba yo puesta, la sorpresa al recibir ese tipo de acercamiento y la sensación de miedo e inseguridad al enfrentarlo.

Define your style: Me gusta reflexionar desde la experiencia de mi cuerpo sobre la complejidad de un problema político –ético como éste y enfocar la reflexión a la reconciliación con nuestros cuerpos y las maneras en que queremos llevarlos.

Say you’re Queen for the day.  What would you do to end street harassment? Más que tipificarlo como delito, trabajaría con educación ciudadana y violencia de género. Además de generar mayores espacios de encuentro y no aislamiento. No creo que el problema se resuelva a largo plazo dividiendo los lugares en espacios para un género y otros para otro.

If you could leave the world one piece of advice, what would it be? Reflexionar sobre la vulnerabilidad como punto de partida ético.

In the year 2020, street harassment … debe ser trabajado desde la gestión publica con mayor seriedad y urgencia.

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Times India Features Hollaback! Chennai

Check out this awesome article published today in the Chennai Times. Reporter Rehna Abdul Kareem investigates Hollaback! Chennai’s bold new venture to stamp out street harassment.

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A Week in Our Shoes: 1/20/22


Greetings Hollaback supporters and revolutionaries!

This is the third installment of our blog series that keeps you up to date on HOLLAnews and our endeavors to stamp out street harassment. Here’s a glimpse of what happened this week in HOLLAworld.
– We held our first site leader training webinar for our new Hollaback! Leaders in Brussels, Belgium; Edmonton, Canada; Halifax, Nova Scotia, San Fransisco, California; and Portsmouth in the UK.

– Hollaback! Boston attracted the attention of the Jamaica Plain Gazette. Click here to read the article.

– International Movement Co-Ordinator Veronica Pinto, visited the Barnard College Careers fair to represent Hollaback! and scout some new blood for the revolution.

– Lastly, we extend a warm and excited HOLLAwelcome to International Movement intern Natalie and Thought Leadership intern Catherine.

Thanks Hollaback! supporters for another fantastic week of fighting street harassment and keeping the revolution alive.

HOLLA and out!


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“Gay Panic” and “Trans Panic”: Not a Worthy Excuse for Murder

Eliminate the 'gay panic' defence from Queensland law #gaypanic


An ambiguity in Queensland law in Australia allows individuals accused of murder to claim a defense known as “gay panic” to avoid prosecution.

Confused? Guffawing slightly because it’s so ridiculous you can’t believe that this is not an elaborate hoax? You are not alone. More infuriating is that the “gay panic” and “trans panic” defense is not an unusual excuse for some of the most horrific crimes in history.

“Gay Panic” is the subject of a recent petition, which relates to a murder that took place two years ago in Queensland. A man was murdered in the grounds of a church and his attackers were acquitted of murder following a “gay panic” plea.

Also referred to as “homosexual panic” and “Kempf’s disease”, the term was first coined by psychiatrist Edward in 1920 to describe a brief psychosis suffered by targets of unwanted gay attention. Luckily and quite rightly, the defense often fails and has been ruled inadmissible in many juristictions because of a complete lack of scientific evidence. Of course there’s a lack of scientific evidence, it’s as ridiculous as dunking a woman in a river to see if she’s a witch.

In a closer look into the history of “gay panic” I was staggered to learn of some of the horrific crimes committed where this defense has lessened prison sentences. In 1995, Jonathan Schmitz was tried for the murdered of friend Scott Amedure, who admitted on “The Jenny Jones Show” that he had romantic feelings for Schmitz. A week after the admission, Schmitz bought a gun, went to Amedure’s home and shot him twice in the chest. Schmitz claimed diminished responsibility citing “gay panic”, claiming that the humiliation and anger provoked by Amedure’s confession drove him to kill. Schmitz was found guilty of second-degree murder. First degree murder is characterized by premeditation, despite taking a week to murder Amedure, Schmitz actions were found to be unplanned.

Then in 2004 “trans panic” was used in the ghastly murder of transgender teenager Gwen Araujo in California. Two of her attackers were convicted of second-degree murder, but not convicted on the requested hate-crime enhancements. The other two men pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter. Despite being regarded as a “mostly” irrelevant defense it needs to be made simply a prohibited defense.

So do something awesome today to help your fellow man and sign this petition to urge “Queensland parliament and LNP leader Campbell Newman to eliminate this law as a partial defense for murder, and forbid non-violent homosexual advance being treated as evidence in any murder trial.” So far the petition has 21,874 signatures, but they need 25,000. So get clicking HOLLArevolutionaries, let’s reject these archaic values that condone prejudice and violence against LGBTQ individuals.


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Dr. Vajayjay’s! Privatize Those Privates!


Confused? Excited? Don’t worry. Dr. Vajayjay can fix that.

The New View Campaign has put together a parody training video as part of its Vulvanomics activist event.

In this video, we see an enterprising, unscrupulous, nominal doctor capitalizing on externally-created insecurities, sexualizing genital mutilation and effectively pathologizing female sexuality. His bumbling assistant Steve sees the truth but is powerless to stop the charlatan, money-hungry Dr. Vajayjay. Meanwhile, nameless female prop character is kept in the dark, the pawn in the doctor’s get-rich-quick scheme.

“Dr. Vajayjay does not solve problems; he makes the most of them.”

What most interests me about labiaplasty and “cosmetogynecology” is how easy our contemporary culture makes it for such corporatized quack medicine to succeed: Our puritanical lack of honest, pleasure-based sex education coupled with the preponderance of sexualized advertisements (which rigidly define attractiveness and sexuality in terms of white, nubile teenage girls) makes it easy to manufacture discontent and stigmatize the ignorant masses into believing they’re deficient.

What is normal anyway? Genital diversity, like all manner of physical, racial and gender diversity is sorely lacking in mainstream media. In a rigid, capitalistic-at-all-costs culture, it’s easy to create unnecessary insecurity about what is deemed “normal,” especially when sexuality, women and female genitalia are so regularly and unremarkably criticized and scapegoated. With the help of female genital surgery, “naughty, nasty” vulvas, Dr. Vajayjay purports, can be turned into generic, prepubescent-looking “normal” vulvas, hence instantly achieving for their owners utter sexual, interpersonal, creative and self-actualized happiness. Right?

But doesn’t genital surgery remove sensitive tissue? Aren’t doctors co-opting scientific and feminist language to assume the mantle of legitimacy, then sexing it all up as “what women want”?

Sure they are. Welcome to America!

New View Campaign is a grassroots network that challenges the medicalization of sexuality through song, dance, and— well, mostly the written word and various activist/art projects. Founder Leonore Tiefer was featured widely in the muckraking documentary Orgasm, Inc.


HOLLAWho? Meet Birmingham.

Meet Zoe, the environmental advocate fighting street harassment in Birmingham, UK.

Why do you HOLLA? I HOLLA because I’m sick of half the population being objectified and harassed in every sphere of their lives. Because street harassment is totally accepted and hardly ever confronted. Because this needs to change!!

What’s your signature Hollaback? Leave me alone. Go away. Ocasionally fuck off – but I wouldn’t recommend this!

What’s your craft? I’m currently working for a small development NGO/charity in Chintsa, South Africa for the next few months – but still running Hollaback Birmingham and will be back! I plan to spend my life working within the women’s rights arena.

HOLLAfact about your city: Birmingham has more canals then Venice! Also despite being the second largest city in the UK, it has no rape crisis center.

What was your first experience with street harassment? Probably when I was about 13 years old walking to the local shop with my friend. A large group of boys, between about 10-20 years old, starting cat calling and shouting: ‘hey gorgeous, oi sexy, suck my cock, come on give me a bit of head, stuck up bitch.’ I just ignored them and walked away quickly. They proceeded to get louder and more abusive, and finally started throwing glass bottles, they all smashed pretty close to us but luckily none of them hit us!

Define your style: I basically dress like I’m constantly at a music festival. Think summery dresses and shorts no matter the weather (just add tights!). I struggle to dress smart and I never wear trousers!

What do you collect? Passport stamps and bunting!

My superheroine power is… surviving on very little money!

Say you’re Queen for the day.  What would you do to end street harassment? I think that the key is education and awareness. I would definitely make feminist issues, including street harassment, part of the curriculum in schools. Boys need to learn from an early age that this is not acceptable and not a route they need to go down to live up ideals about masculinity. Girls need to understand that their value does not lie in their perceived attractiveness and that harassment is not acceptable and never their fault.

In turn, the general public needs to be made aware of what a big problem street harassment is and how it makes women feel. I would start an advert campaign on the T.V, radio, billboards, and every other medium possible to highlight the issue and to open up a dialogue about street harassment.

If you could leave the world one piece of advice, what would it be? The world’s resources aren’t infinite and are going to run out. Climate change is real. We need to wake up and realize that we are destroying the planet before it’s too late, and it very nearly is.

In the year 2020, street harassment … will be recognized as a totally unacceptable form of gender based violence.

What inspires you? People who risk their lives and reputation for what they believe in, who fight for an ethical right despite threats, bribes and social/political pressure. Who believe the cause they fight for is more important than their own individual experience. The fact that nothing has ever changed without people taking a personal responsibility to push for it and that we are all capable of making a difference. In the words of Margaret Mead ‘Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.’

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