Article

Tell WMATA Public Street Harassment is a Problem!

Collective Action for Safe Spaces/Holla Back DC! are joining forces for a public performance oversight hearing of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) held by the Council of the District of Columbia. Check out this blog piece that is cross posted from Collective Action for Safe Spaces

Sexual comments, leering, groping and public masturbation: sexual harassment happens a lot on public transportation in Washington, DC. Collective Action for Safe Spaces/Holla Back DC! has beentracking and speaking out on this issue for three years. Now we’re doing something more – testifying. And we need your help.

 

We need people to testify with us about the issue of sexual harassment on public transportation during the late afternoon of Wednesday, Feb. 22, for a public performance oversight hearing of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) held by the Council of the District of Columbia.

We are looking for people:

1) Willing to share a story or stories about sexual harassment on metro trains and buses,

2) Who can talk about sexual harassment they’ve witnessed,

3) Who can be part of the audience to help fill the room.

Testimonies are only 3 minutes long (about a page and a half). If you want to learn more about writing and presenting compelling testimony or want feedback on a draft, we will hold an optional training on Saturday, Feb. 18, 1-3 p.m. at the Southeast Library (across the from Eastern Market metro station). Susie Cambria will lead the training.

If you’re interested in providing testimony or helping to fill the room, please contact info@collectiveactiondc.org by February 17.

If we have enough people testifying, possible outcomes could be:

Council Member Muriel Bowser (who is overseeing the hearing and is from Ward 4) will be aware of the issue and could even propose legislation to help prevent sexual harassment on Metro.

Council Member Bowser could question the Director of Metro to find out why our concerns have not been addressed.

The Director of Metro could be more likely to address our concerns and take actions we recommend such as providing training for employees.

 

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Article, campaign, demonstration

Knockout Barstool Takes on Blackout Tour

BY CATHERINE FAVORITE

You probably don’t frequent women-hating websites all that often. Luckily, you have others to do the dirty work for you! A blog aimed at college-aged men called Barstool Sports, showcases a slew of dehumanizing attitudes toward women while disguising itself an entertainment website: “By the common man, for the common man”. By portraying their degrading attitudes toward women as some sort of normal, socially acceptable viewpoint to hold, they participate in the continuation of women being treated as nothing more than objects to be rated by their appearance alone. This winter, the group has been hosting a “Blackout Party” tour near college campuses throughout the East coast and the Midwest.

 

Just a few of the shining comments to come from Barstool Sports’ site:

PS – Just to make friends with the feminists I’d like to reiterate that we don’t condone rape of any kind at our Blackout Parties in mid-January. However if a chick passes out that’s a grey area though.

Even though I never condone rape, if you’re a size 6 and you’re wearing skinny jeans you kind of deserve to be raped right? I mean skinny jeans don’t look good on size 0 and 2 chicks, nevermind size 6’s.

Thankfully, there is a new group in town called Knockout Barstool. We applaud a letter they wrote earlier this week, taking down the rape-culture promoting blog and “Blackout Party” tour. There is a big difference between allowing free speech on college campuses and turning the other ear to the hate speech of an organization. Today, Barstool’s “Blackout Party” tour comes to Boston. Here at Hollaback!, we fully support Knockout Barstool’s requests that Northeastern University denounce the hate speech of Barstool Sports:

We demand Northeastern University and its administration stand for women and denounce Barstool Sports and the NU Blackout Party. These organizations do not represent the values of our community nor our institution. As President Joseph Aoun said in a recent email to the university: “While we should actively engage different opinions and points of view — and this may result in strong and intense discussions—we will not tolerate any conduct that creates a hostile or intimidating environment for members of our community.” Barstool Sports and their blackout party creates a hostile and intimidating environment for women. We must demand an equal and safe university culture.

A recent post by Barstool Sports about the work of Hollaback!’s Executive Director, Emily May revealed the tired occurrence of insulting a woman’s appearance because they took issue with what she had to say. In so doing, Barstool tried to reinforce the notion that the worst possible thing a man could say to a woman is that he does not want to sleep with her, rather than choosing to have a civil conversation with her.

Thank you, Barstool Sports, for providing us with such an apt example of why we must continue working.

–You might notice we did not link to Barstool Sports’s website, as we do not wish to give them the satisfaction of more site hits. Please enjoy the following screen shots instead (misspelling of “harrassment” included).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Article

Worth Checking Out – The Arkh Project

REPOSTED FROM HOLLABACK HOUSTON

Co-director Ricki here… I stumbled across The Arkh Project yesterday while bumbling around on the net, and thought it would be and thought it would be worth checking out and supporting.

The Arkh Project is a project to create a 3D RPG video game that “focuses on queer people and people of color as main characters” and is currently being developed and designed by queer folks and POC. Any money donated goes to the development of the game, as all volunteers and coordinators are donating their free time to the project. How cool!

Check it out and support if you can, you can also follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

Plus, if you’re into linear RPGs… it looks pretty awesome :-)

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Article, News, Nonverbal Harassment, public masturbation, Street harassment in the media

Gawker Gets it Wrong

BY EMILY MAY AND CATHERINE FAVORITE

Today Gawker featured the story of a woman who witnessed public masturbation on the subway – and the pictures she took in response.  While we are happy to see Gawker highlighting the issue of street harassment, their analysis was off. Way off.

“Obviously, there’s no proof of lewd behavior in these pictures, just one woman’s story so, who knows, this guy could be innocent [emphasis added].

What is it with the media’s insistence that women’s reports of sexual violence are untrustworthy? It’s an old myth that stands in the way of progress. The FBI says that “unfounded” rape claims stand at 8%.  But that tiny little 8% gives the media enough ammo to question all reports of sexual violence.  Articles like Gawker’s tend to have a silencing effect on the rest of us, which is perhaps why 75-95% of rapes go unreported, making rape the “most under-reported crime” according to the American Medical Association.  But why stop at questioning the victim? Gawker also offered the victim a little advice:

Also, it’s probably wise to contact the police before reaching out to a gossip blog when a crime has occurred.

Oh, Gawker.  We know you’re DC-based so let’s fill you in on how this goes down. If you tell the NYPD, they might ignore you. If they don’t, you have to sit in front of a big black book of all the sexual offenders in the subway. If you don’t get totally freaked out and run screaming, you *might* find your guy.  And then what? It’s a long, painful court process.  No wonder victims turn to the internet for reprieve.  And no wonder we have a robust “no coulda woulda shoulda” policy. Victims of sexual violence deserve to have whatever response makes sense to them most, because after all, it wasn’t their fault.

So Gawker, next time someone shares their experience of street harassment with you, perhaps you could politely suggest that gentlemen of the world refrain from public masturbation?  It seems like good advice to us.

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Article, campaign, demonstration, News, Street harassment in the media

International Anti-Street Harassment Week, March 18-24

BY CATHERINE FAVORITE

Come “Meet Us On the Street”, for International Anti-Street Harassment week, from March 18-24, to take a stand against street harassment! Last year’s first International Anti-Street Harassment Day was so successful, with over thousands of people participating in 13 countries, that this year, the folks of Stop Street Harassment are dedicating an entire week to raising public awareness to end gender-based verbal harassment.

 

In speaking out against catcalls, sexist comments, public masturbation, groping, stalking, and assault, you will help to create a sustained dialogue surrounding how women, girls and the LGBTQ community must endure a level of verbal and physical street violence that continues to be an inevitable reality for far too many people. The widespread acceptance of gender and sexuality based street harassment has created a silent suffering that wrongfully places the burden of street harassment onto those receiving the harassment, leaving harassers free to continue. In the past, a casual acceptance of street harassment for LGBTQ individuals, women and girls has created a stigma of shame and silence. International Anti-Street Harassment Week is a way of countering this. By making this a part of the public discussion, we can change the culture of acceptance surrounding street harassment. No one should have to change the way they walk to school or work, or worry if their clothing might draw unwanted attention. This week is about calling for the right of everyone to be treated as equals in all shared public spaces. Just as sexual harassment is not tolerated in schools, work or at home, we should not accept it from strangers on the streets, either!

 

Meet Us On the Street offers many ways for how you can participate, whether by taking to the street on March 24th with your friends and community, bringing up street harassment in conversations, to tweeting about it (#NoSHWeek) and changing your Facebook photo during the third week of March. You can also organize action in your community and submit it to the map so others in your area can find out about it.

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Article

HOLLAWho? Meet Ottawa.

Meet Julie Lalonde, the eternal optimist fighting street harassment in Ottawa, Canada.

Why do you HOLLA? Because it’s what my grandmother would want me to do.

What’s your signature Hollaback? I’m sure your mother is proud!

What’s your craft? Feminist advocate.

HOLLAfact about your city: We are the home of the world’s largest skating rink! We’re also the city that fun forgot. Sadly.

What was your first experience with street harassment? When I was in middle school, my aunt surprised me with tickets to the ballet in Toronto. Being a small town kid, we decided to make it into a full on vacation. On one night, we stopped at a bank machine as we headed back to the hotel. My mom soon noticed that someone was following us.

I remember how panicked my mom and aunt were and how they quickly picked up their pace. We walked a few more blocks, trying not to look scared while the man kept following us. Finally, my mom dragged us into a local bar where she had to explain the whole situation to the bartender in order to justify having a minor with her!

Define your style: My voice is my weapon of choice.

My superheroine power is… eternal optimism.

What do you collect? Haters

Say you’re Queen for the day.  What would you do to end street harassment? I’d institute mandatory community service to anyone caught street harassing and a day at the spa for every victim!

If you could leave the world one piece of advice, what would it be? Don’t be afraid to take the lead! If you see a gap, FILL IT.

What inspires you? “Martin Luther King Jr. didn’t become famous for saying ‘I have a complaint'” I read this amazing motto by eco-activist Van Jones a few years ago and I couldn’t have said it better myself. I’m continuously inspired by people who see a problem and make an attempt to fix it. There will always be cynics and haters, but how many of them come to the table with a solution?

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Article

Interview: Boston-Feminist on “Why I Punched a Stranger”

BY CATHERINE FAVORITE

A few weeks ago, a blogger out of Boston penned a thought provoking piece on a particular encounter she had with a street harasser in Allston, Massachusetts. Titled, “Why I Punched a Stranger”, Allison’s story raises many points on how women, particularly women in the LGBTQ community, all too often experience verbal violence on the street. Thank you, Allison, for sharing your experiences with us!

 

Tell us about the first time you were street harassed. How old were you, and how did you respond?

I don’t remember the first time I was harassed on the street, but I think I must have been 13 or 14. It’s hard to pinpoint the first time because as young girls we aren’t aware enough to realize that men telling us to smile or pressing us for conversation isn’t okay. Encounters like that just left me with bad feelings in my gut.
Your post has received tons of attention on Jezebel and throughout the blogsphere. Why do you think that is?
I believe my post created a stir for a couple reasons. First, it struck a chord with women and queers who are harassed on a regular basis and showed that we can break the silence about these experiences. Secondly, a lot of people got worked up in the controversy of the punch. We’re taught that violence is never okay, period. But pacifism is a privileged position for people to be able to take, and in many cases I think it’s because they have not been the target of abuse. It’s interesting because many people believe that my act was violent, but don’t see repeated, menacing, degrading behavior as violent, when that behavior can be so damaging to our mental and emotional wellbeing.
On Jezebel and your blog, many commenters seem to think Allston, Mass. is a breeding ground for street harassers. Do you think women and LGBTQ individuals are more prone to harassment in Allston than in other areas?
Allston has a disproportionate amount of street harassment compared to other neighborhoods, partially because of the BU [Boston University] bros who act like the town is their playground. People seem to think I’m exaggerating about experiencing street harassment every day here, but truly, not a day in Allston goes by that I don’t receive unwanted sexual attention. It happens everywhere though; it’s just very blatant here.
What would you say to those who say we should “just ignore or walk away” from street harassers?
Sometimes ignoring or walking away is the safest thing to do in that moment. However, doing so just proves to harassers that they are free to keep bullying. Standing up for yourself, whether that is verbal or physical, can be very empowering. It’s not up to other people to decide what will be empowering for you, so I urge targets of harassment to do whatever will make you feel safest and strongest. As for men’s role in stopping street harassment, I believe it is absolutely necessary for men to call out their friends on their actions. Only with allies of all genders and sexualities do we have a shot at smashing rape culture.
Did you feel more safe punching this guy because your girlfriend was with you?
I didn’t feel safe punching the guy and half-expected to be hit back. I probably wouldn’t have hit him if I weren’t both with my girlfriend and on a populated street. It had just gotten to the point where I was willing to physically put my body on the line to confront the verbal abuse I experience every day.
You mentioned that after years of being harassed by strangers daily, you “snapped” and that the guy “got the brunt of my rage of him and hundreds of other men’s blatant sexual harassment.  The punch I threw carried the pain and solidarity of thousands of other women, queers and other non-normative people who are targeted by hate and ignorance every day.” Now that the punch has been thrown — how are you going to target your anger and pain? Do you think you’ll ever punch a street harasser again?
I target my anger and pain into consciousness raising and activist work. Hearteningly enough, some amazing feminist work has been blossoming in the Boston area lately. An advocacy group called Knockout Barstool just formed at Northeastern University to call out a blog that promotes rape culture through its “Blackout Tour”. The Boston branch of Permanent Wave (NY-based feminist group) has its first meeting this Sunday. I’m involved with the Women’s Caucus of Occupy Boston, and Occupy Allston-Brighton has a feminist/anti-oppression working group I want to get involved with. Basically I want to be part of a greater effort to raise consciousness in our society and destroy rape culture. I don’t have plans to hit anyone again, but I will stand up for myself and my loved ones in whatever way is necessary.

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Article

Hollaback! Istanbul In Time Out Istanbul

Time out Istanbul

BY HOLLABACK! ADMIN

It is so wonderful to see that the Hollaback! global phenomenon is hitting headlines all over the world. Last week it was Hollaback! Chennai featured in The Times India and this week Hollaback! Istanbul has made it into Time Out Instanbul.

So congratulations Istanbul for giving women and LGBTQ individuals a platform to share their street harassment stories and the right to feel safe and confident on the streets of Turkey without fear of harassment or objectification. And thank you Hollaback! Istanbul for sparking a national conversation on street harassment in Turkey.

To read the full article click here.

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Article

Black is Beautiful

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Black is Beautiful movement, the Black and Latino Film Coalition has created the Black is Beautiful project, a documentary and Public Service Announcement that reflects the beauty opinions of 100 Black and Latina women. Take a look at the teaser here:

Black is Beautiful Documentary Promo Video from BLFC on Vimeo.

The documentary maker’s vision for the project is that the film will be viewed by hundreds of students each of whom can connect with an onscreen person that looks like they do or looks like a friend or relative. Viewers will witness and engage in the “active celebration of strength, power and beauty of being a woman of color.”

But in order to make this a success the Black and Latino Film Coalition needs your help! For too long the media has projected a very narrow set of guidelines that stipulate what it is to be beautiful, so help us show the world that beauty is a multi-faceted concept that spans culture and ethnicity. To help bring Black is Beautiful to high schools, colleges and beyond visit their fundraising campaign on Indiegogo and make a donation today!

In order to bring this message to high schools, colleges and beyond, the Black Is Beautiful Project needs your help! Visit their fundraising campaign on Indiegogo, read their mission and make a donation. Be sure to tell a friend to tell a friend.

OR if you want to be a part of this exclusive cohort of beautiful women of color then submit your headshot, a small bio and a paragraph on “Why Black is Beautiful?” casting@blackandlatinofilm.com.

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Article

A Week in Our Shoes: 1/27/12

The HOLLAteam before the MEN show!

BY EMILY MAY

Greetings Hollaback supporters and revolutionaries!

Check out this week ‘s HOLLAnews and updates with our latest installment of A Week in Our Shoes:

Out and about! International Movement Coordinator, Veronica Pinto, our new Movement Building Intern, Natalie Richman, myself, and our three super-supportive partners attended the MEN concert presented by our partners Permanent Wave. We got to meet the revolutionary JD Sampson (swoon) and I got to speak about our work to end street harassment.  Also, board member and founder of Mama’s Hip Hop kitchen, Kathleen Adams, is representing Hollaback! at a charity event Masquerade Noir Birthday Bash for DJ Mary Mac and LiKWUiD presented by pretty|UGLY NYC at the Silhouette Lounge in the Bronx this Saturday. On a more serious note, I also attended the Manhattan Borough President’s Domestic Violence Task Force this week and learned more about their work to address forced childhood marriages.

Engaging Legislators! Natalie Richman, our new intern, is busy printing maps that we will use to show local legislators here in NYC where street harassment is happening in their district. We’ll be setting up meetings with legislators, and with any luck, holding the second annual city council street harassment hearing this spring!

Help needed! We’ve now got a fancy new donor database called Salesforce. This may sound boring to you, but to us it’s very exciting! But we need some help figuring out how to use it.  Check here for a pro-bono job descriptions of what we’re looking for — and let us know if you’re able to help or if you know anyone who is.

Thanks Hollaback! supporters for another fantastic week of fighting street harassment and keeping the revolution alive!

HOLLA and out!

Emily

 

 

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