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31 days of HOLLA

This December, Hollaback! is honoring our site leaders with the 31 days of HOLLA. Each day of the month, we’ll highlight the work of one of our amazing sites around the world.

Who’s our HOLLAhero for December 1st? Hollaback! Dublin!

In Hollaback! Dublin’s first year they’ve blown us away: marching in Dublin Pride, traveling to NYC for HOLLA::Revolution, generating major national and regional press, and celebrating their first birthday! Send them some love at dublin.ihollaback.org!

 

dublinhollapride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Article

Transgender Day of Remembrance : Harassment Is

Today, in honor of Transgender Day of Remembrance, we’re taking some time to read over a section from our #HarassmentIs publication.  These stories highlight many of ways that transfolks experience violence and discrimination in public spaces.  At Hollaback!, we believe that everyone should have equal and safe access to public spaces.  This Transgender Day of Remembrance we encourage you to share your stories and stand up against street harassment.  Let’s work together to make spaces safer for everyone.

From pages 29-31 of Harassment Is: An Exploration of Identity and Street Harassment

“I always fancy myself one of the bros. I’ve struggled with the idea of being transgender, but have a deep rooted belief in loving my body no matter what….but [once I was harassed] ..I didn’t feel fear. What I did feel though was humiliation and disconnect. In one comment a complete stranger disrupted my place in my group.” – Hollaback!’er

Transgender people may feel that their assigned sex at birth does not match their internal sex or gender.  Trans identities, like most identities, exist on a wide spectrum.

Many people exist outside of the either/or of man or women, or come to those identities in different ways.  Sadly, a lot of people who identify as trans and/or gender-non conforming face violence, harassment, sexualization, fetishization, and discrimination.  Sometimes this violence can be physical, and sometimes it can also be psychological.  Imagine what it feels like to not be seen for who you are.

The story below highlights some of the anger, sadness, and frustration that can come along with not being seen as your gender and experiencing street harassment.  Elizabeth writes,

“I was walking out of Starbucks and two college-age looking guys yelled “faggot” at me. I am a transgender woman and I have no problem with people noticing that I am a transgender woman. I am very offended when people call me things that I am not. I was so angry that I threw my coffee to the ground and just got in my car and left.” http://bit.ly/15U0qMs

The next story sheds light on the very real threat of violence and escalation of street harassment as a trans* person.  One Hollaback!’er writes,

“I think often when we speak about transgender issues, that human voice and visibility is missing. Therefore, I feel it is important to share one of my own stories with bathroom harassment. Often when I first was transitioning, I would do my best to avoid public restrooms…When you are transitioning from using the female restrooms to male restrooms a lot changes. You fear going into female restrooms because women constantly tell you that you are in the wrong restroom. They yell at you, and protect their children like you are going to hurt them…See, because as much as we fear that verbal harassment, I now fear the physical assault upon entering the men’s restroom. It’s hard to confront those who know you or strangers when they state you don’t have a penis, this means you are not a man, get out, freak, etc…It’s not only the physical threat that scares me when this happens, but the mental damage of constantly feeling threatened or fearing another assault as I choose what uniform to wear any given day: is it the straight male, the gay male, the butch female that will cause me the least harm, and more so why must we choose what option means least harm. Which option will disarm those directing assaults at me.”

http://bit.ly/1fJxjPP

 

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Guest Post by Mohadesa Najumi, “Sick of Street Harassment”

In our modern, global society sexual abuse exists as the most colossus impediment to gender equality. Street harassment, in particular, is a human rights issue that it serves as a daily, tangible reminder of the disparity between male and female power and freedoms.

Street harassment is not something restricted to a single culture or one concentrated area of the world. A recent study concluded that street harassment affects 80% of women worldwide, one in five women in the UK and similar figures in the U.S.

Street harassment can be defined as any unwelcome sexual behavior, be it physical or verbal. Catcalling is street harassment. Unwanted sexual looks or gestures are street harassment. Whistling or winking is street harassment.

Street harassment primarily affects women and limits their access to public places in volumes inexperienced by the opposite sex.

Women are forced to change commuting routes, only go to places accompanied, change jobs, quit hobbies and even move neighborhoods in order to avoid further harassment. And even with such radical measures; there is no guaranteeing that sexual harassment will ever stop.

StopStreetHarassment defines the endemic as:

“An invisible problem.. Dismissed as being a “minor annoyance,” a “joke,” or the fault of the harassed person.. it’s a human rights violation that must be addressed”

One of the major misunderstandings with street harassment is that it only comes in physical form. Both men and women largely misapprehend this. Not all forms of abuse come in touching or groping; verbal street harassment is equally as destructive as physical harassment. Just words can be enough to exercise power over somebody.

Sexual comments about women’s clothing, anatomy, or looks, referring to women as “babe”, or “honey”, kissing sounds, howling, pressure for dates, whistling, cat calling and asking about sexual fantasies, preferences, or history are all forms of verbal sexual harassment.

Studies have shown that street harassment can have severely negative implications on the well-being of young adult women, some even going as far as to blame themselves or not leaving their homes in order to avoid it. Public transport is particularly ridden with street harassers since there is nowhere for women to escape to.

An innovative resistance project labeled ”Stop Telling Women to Smile” launched by Brooklyn based artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh is aimed at curtailing prevalent street harassment in Harlem, New York. Fazlalizadeh places portraits of women, defiant and impactful, in the very spaces where strangers have hounded her. She describes:

“The project is saying that street harassment is not okay. That feeling entitled to treat and speak to women any type of way, is not okay. That demanding a woman’s attention is not okay. That intruding on a woman’s space and thoughts is not okay. That women should be able to walk to the train, to the grocery store, to
school – without having to cross the street to avoid the men that she sees
already eyeing her as she approaches. That making women feel objectified,
sexualized simply because they are women, is not okay”.

Fazlalizadeh’s street posters reflect a wider sentiment expressed by women all over the world that street harassment is simply not a compliment.

Among many things, street harassment is an inconvenience and frustration. Above all else; it is an infringement on women’s essential rights and a derailment of gender equality progression. Sweet Machine best explains this abuse of rights:

“If you speak to a woman who is otherwise occupied, you’re sending a subtle message. It is that your desire to interact trumps her right to be left alone. Street harassment indicates that you believe your desires are a legitimate reason to
override her rights.”

For women who are dealing with a daily barrage of physical and/or verbal assault another key issue is at play; there is no telling who is a dangerous perpetrator.

As expressed in my article on Rape Culture in the Feminist Wire, our current milieu is a harrowing one; women are constantly victimized under a culture of physical, emotional and sexual terrorism. This constitutes a culture of rape that maintains an environment of sexual assault so that rape is viewed as normal, and even inevitable.

In this case, a rape culture does not allow for women to differentiate between dangerous and non-dangerous assailants since assault is so prevalent. Any male approaching you can be regarded as a threat, until proven otherwise. Women are forced to remain alert and on-guard, fearing the worst and discerning possible threats from street harassers. This
undoubtedly exasperates the magnitude of street harassment.

Male collaboration is absolutely imperative in ending sexual harassment. This is not to say that women need male protection from street harassment — this would be a perpetuation of patriarchal ideals depicting women as helpless damsels and re-enforcing erroneous conceptions of masculinity.

Instead, I am calling for male allies: men who accept that street harassment are endemic and are willing to act on and educate others on this knowledge. Here are some examples male allies expressing their angst towards the problem:

“Harassment is never about complimenting women, and it never has been. You may respond, “But I’m not trying to bother her, just be complimentary.” In that case, see above; it doesn’t matter what your intent is, it matters how what you do is received by her. This can be hard for us as men to hear, but intent doesn’t matter in
this case.”

Joe Vess, Former Director of Training at Men Can Stop Rape.

“As men, our silence is deafening and we continue to ignore the canary in the mine which says our community needs to deal with issues of gender and power. Until we see street harassment as the problem that it is, we’ll continue to live in our neighborhoods like the miner who labors in a mine with a dead canary, until
it’s too late to get to safety.”

Dr. L’Heureux Dumi Lewis, Assistant Professor at the City College of New York.

Street harassment is ultimately a deplorable method at objectifying, sexualizing and trivializing women. There are many ways for you to act against street harassment.

Educate everyone around you on the importance of refraining from harassment and rally male and female peers to act against it. Sharing a story or joining anti-street harassment organizations is another imperative move towards raising awareness. We won’t end worldwide street harassment, but local initiatives have national impact and slowly but surely, we will erode the street harassment mentality.

 

Resources:

What is Sexual Harassment? Facts and Outlines: http://www.un.org/womenwatch/osagi/pdf/whatissh.pdf

Stop StreetHarassment is a nonprofit organization dedicated to documenting and ending gender-based street harassment worldwide: http://www.stopstreetharassment.org/

Femme De LaRue: A powerful documentary on street harassment: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xsknaq_femme-de-la-rue-sexism-in-the-streets-of-brussels-english-subtitles_webcam

HollaBack is a movement to end street harassment powered by a network of local activists around the world: http://www.ihollaback.org/ 

Everyday Stranger Harassment and Women’s Objectification (2008) by KimberlyFairchild Laurie A. Rudman: http://www.stopstreetharassment.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/KimberlyFairchildStreetHarassarticle.pdf

 

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Article

A week in our shoes: FRENCH GLAMOUR + 7 NEW SITES

 

Hey Hollabackers!

Fall is in full swing here at Hollaback.  I was in GLAMOUR MAGAZINE (in france no less!) with our site leaders from London and France (pictured above), and we launched SEVEN new sites this week!  They include:

Edinburgh, Scotland (Check out their interview in the Scotsman here, their launch party was yesterday!)
Lima, Peru
Melbourne, Australia (Their launch party was yesterday!)
NYU
Poland
Sheffield, South Yorkshire (Their launch party is tonight! Check out their mention in the F-word blog here and their BBC radio interview here, they are 1 hour 36 minutes and 30 seconds in.)
Victoria, (BC) Canada
And that’s not all! Here’s what else happened:

Recommendations for policymakers! Based on our findings in the report “When Street Harassment Comes Indoors,” we made a list of recommendations for policy-makers and service providers looking for ideas to combat street harassment. Check them out and pass them on to your local legislators.

Hollaback Benefit Drag show, September 22nd at Stonewall! This Party to benefit Hollaback will feature Music Spun all night by Dj Executive Realness and two drag shows hosted by Frostie Flakes! Suggested donation at the door $5. RSVP on facebook, here.

Thank you, Vicky! As you may remember, Vicky Simister from the UK Anti-Street Harassment Campaign was here in our office helping us with social media and our new college campaign this summer. She was an incredible volunteer, and on a more personal note, became an incredible friend.  She may no longer work at Hollaback, but she’ll always be a Hollaback girl in our hearts!

Welcome, Tabasum! Tabasum Wolayat comes from Afganistan and is volunteering with us for the next three weeks before she heads off to a Master’s program at Oxford. She won awards for her undergraduate thesis on street harassment in Afganistan, and is currently working with Young Women For Change to launch Afganistan’s first women-only internet cafe.

Hollaback Baltimore holds first ever Street Harassment water balloon fight! THIS IS A MUST WATCH VIDEO:

Hollaback South Africa fights for women to be allowed to sing in public. Check out this video of their powerful campaign:

Whew! Whatta week. It wouldn’t be possible without your support.

HOLLA and out -

Emily

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Article, demonstration

Liz’s story: “I am in my fifties/old enough to be their grandma”

Walking home from station, hollared at & hooted at from a passing car. Made me mad as I am in my fifties/old enough to be their grandma I reckon. It is soooo unnecessary.

I've got your back!
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Article

Dear mister,

Dear mister,

I hereby would like to sincerely apologize, for having ignored your questions today.
I must say that I’m not proud of myself. And I will try to be nicer the next time.

This being said, I would also like to take a moment to help you with your search.
If I understood correctly, you are looking for someone to fuck.

Allow me to point out, that shouting at a random girl, might not be a good way to handle it.
Women kind of need foreplay, you see.

I advise you to try eye contact the next time. And some small talk, before asking the girl on a proper date. A nice restaurant. Maybe a movie.
It takes some effort, but I’m sure you’ll multiply your chances of getting lucky very fast.

On the other hand, if you already know that women need some warming up, this becomes a whole other story. In that case I think you should find out why you enjoy being impolite.

Is it because your mother and sister hit you repeatedly, which made you hate all women? Or do you just have a teeny-tiny little weiner?

Whatever the issue may be, I truly hope you understand what your problem is.
Because I sure don’t.

Any which way, I wish you a good day and a quick lay.

Kind regards,

Femke

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HOLLA on the go: Right back ‘atcha.

This guy took a picture of me on the subway. He forgot to turn off the flash so I caught him and decided to return the favor.

I've got your back!
59+

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A week in our shoes: CATS AGAINST CATCALLING

Hey Hollabackers –

I’m on vacation this week, but our fierce staff and volunteers are keeping the movement moving (with your support of course)! Here’s the roundup:

CATS against CATCALLING tumblr launches! Check it out — and if you love it — spread the word! We’ll have it up for a month, and longer if it takes off.  You can submit your own “kitteh” too!

 

Hollaback! Melbourne Organizes a Site Launch Party! Entry is $5 and includes tea/coffee, special ‘holla’ cupcakes, a Hollaback badge and an arts and crafts station. Guest speaker Lauren Rosewarne will be speaking at 8pm. More details are here.

 

Hollaback NYC Calls for Local Assemblymember who Sexually Harassed Staff to Step Down.  We wrote the statement last Saturday, a day after the allegations were made public, and he stepped down as Brooklyn party boss later in the week.  We’re continuing to push for him step down from his Assembly seat, so stay tuned. Our full statement can be found here.

 

Boston Chalked it up! Check out their street art here (and to the right!).

 

Rebecca Faria, Founder of Hollaback! Halifax spoke at “Walk With Her: DIY Healthcare.” The description reads, “The healthcare debate has never been so heated, but we’re meeting outside the OR rooms and talking about the things that really do matter most; building walkable cities, accessible mental health services, and how to make “local” more than a slogan.” We couldn’t agree more! Details for the event are here and you can follow Hollaback Halifax on facebook here. Hollaback Halifax has been embraced by the recently launched “GAYBOURHOOD WATCH,” a community organization to prevent crime and violence in Halifax’s gay neighbourhood. Check out their press mentions on CBC (Hollaback ismentioned at 5:40 and again about a minute later), Metronews, and Openfile.

 

Hollaback Turkey in the News! Check them out in Today’s Zaman and the SES Turkiye.

 

Don’t we have the best team in the world? I think so. And you’re part of it.

 

HOLLA and out –

Emily

 

 

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Welad El Balad: Fighting street harassment in Egypt

BY SHAHINAZ EL HENNAWI, international movement fellow at Hollaback!

It all started after the Revolution! We, Egyptians began our revolution by years of hard work and a final spark from Tunisia. We desired change and we knew we can do it. We all felt that it is our country, our home, we all went to the streets wanting to share, live and breathe freedom. We wanted to undo all harms of the last many years. For the first time I could actually walk in the streets of Egypt with no fear, I felt we were all brothers and sister, no harm. I went to the square never thinking about sexual harassment. I was walking there in so much crowd with two of my friends then we found  men surrounding us with a circle to protect and keep us from harm since they felt that something was going wrong. They used to send thugs to the square to frighten women and girls so we can go home and not have a voice. But we didn’t stop, we kept going.

After nine months, in Ramadan (the Muslims fasting month) we got an idea that the feast  (3 days Breakfasting after Ramadan called Eid Fitr) should not be like any other feast. It has to be a safe feast for Girls in New Egypt. So my friends and I kept talking about it and not really knowing what to do. Usually in our culture the feast is a big event, where everybody is in the streets and many teens specifically go out and think that sexual harassment is fun to do in these days.

About almost 6 years ago we witnessed for the first time in Egypt mass group sexual harassment in front of the movie theatre and then couple of others took place specially during feast time.

But this time we wanted it to be different, we wanted our campaign to be filled with the energy of freedom and solidarity. So we had an idea to reach out for the community groups (Groups of male youth who were formed during the revolution to protect their neighborhood during the time of chaos right after the revolution began). A friend of mine, Karim from the Green party, who is very politically active decided to work with me on this campaign and he believed so much in the cause. We decided to call it “Welad el Balad” meaning the sons and daughters of the country, it has a culture connotation meaning “Having good manners” So if you call it to someone misbehaving, they would usually become ashame and stop. We started up a facebook event and invited people to join us and we started preparing for this campaign a month before. We reached almost 3000 volunteers in less than a month. We divided our selves into committees, held training for each committee with a specific assignment, we held several events in the street, we approached so many shops and cafes, and during the Eid itself we had shifts on the ground for 3 days, each working on a specific task, such as raising awareness, legal counseling, psychological counseling, survey, music, games, media outreach, in addition to a great show of a football team who volunteered to assist us. The idea behind sports was to engage the young youth is something constructive and shift their perceptions. The young men of the committees served as mentors for the young ones to the extent that some of the young harassers apologized, asked to join the campaign and brought their friends. The campaign demonstrated huge success, we were approached by the media, TV, sponsors, we also were mentioned in NGOs reports.This is the second year of the campaign, where we decided to go beyond Alexandria and reach out to different places in Egypt, I am very proud of my partners on the ground who are currently in the streets working in the campaign instead of having their holiday and enjoying their time with their families. I am watching them with joy and gratitude while being a fellow here in mother Hollaback to return to them with more inspiring actions from all over the world.

For additional information, check out the press coverage of the event here and here.

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It’s US Women’s Eq-HOLLA-ty Day!

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have been treated as second-class citizens and have not been entitled the full rights and privileges, public or private, legal or institutional, which are available to male citizens of the United States; and

WHEREAS, the women of the United States have united to assure that these rights and privileges are available to all citizens equally regardless of sex…and

WHEREAS Hollaback! still has our work cut out for us…

Hey Hollabackers -

Did you know that 92 years ago today the 19th amendment granted women the right to vote in the US because women HOLLA’d back?

It’s true.

But today isn’t just about celebrating the passing of an amendment – it’s about the struggle to get there. It’s about our continuing efforts toward full equality. It’s about those who Hollaback and change the world!

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton HOLLA’d for equal voting rights for women.
Shirley Chisholm HOLLA’d for equal opportunities for African American women in politics.
Billie Jean King HOLLA’d for equal rights and pay for women athletes.
Bella Abzug HOLLA’d for equal labor rights for working women.

At Hollaback, we HOLLA for equal streets for ALL women and LGBTQ individuals! Period.

Make a donation NOW and help us work toward a world where street harassment is not tolerated and where we all enjoy equal access to public spaces.

Your gift supports our efforts to:

Break the silence
Inspire international leadership
Shift public opinion
Engage elected officials

Click here to learn how you can actively participate in the movement to end street harassment!

HOLLA and out –
Emily

PS: How do you Hollaback? Let us know on Twitter  & Facebook  today!

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