demonstration, groping, Story, transphobic

RC’s Story: Grab the bread not my butt!

While I was exploring BaoBao Bakery in Chinatown in broad daylight with friends, a middle-aged elderly man groped my butt twice in the middle of the store, first as a “tester” brush to see how I would react and then a later, stronger touch when my confusion at the first contact did not result in negative consequences. At the time, I was not sure whether the crowdedness of the store was what had caused the touches and whether they had been honest mistakes. Looking back, though, I realized the man could have easily grabbed the breads without touching my butt the way he did.

Instead of suffering in silence, I have decided to Hollaback! by posting this story. I had not taken a picture of my harasser but wish I did. This incident happened in Boston Chinatown, and I am not sure if the man spoke English. I don’t think potential language barriers should prevent women from hollering back – in whatever language they choose – and publicly denouncing their harassers for their behavior. If anything like this happens again, I will not hesitate to Hollaback!

Note: BaoBao Bakery does not deserve special blame. It merely was the location I was in at the time of this incident.

I've got your back!
35+

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demonstration, Story, transphobic, Verbal

Alice’s Story: “Scariest encounter with street harassment in my life”

I was maybe eleven or twelve? Either way I was very young and very innocent. I hadn’t properly hit puberty yet and I wasn’t in any way old for my age. In short, I was just a kid. I was walking home by the local shops, right in front of Mcdonalds when a man (35? 40?)hissed “You’re looking great, sweetie, I want you” or words to that effect. I freaked out and ran home, crying, where some friends saw me in the park. I cried and explained what had happened and my girlfriends soothed me and organised a lift home for me. That was upsetting, but not as upsetting as the reaction the next few days. People would come up to me, curiously asking if I had been raped, because that was what they had heard from a friend who heard from a friend who said they were there. Some boys came up to me, teasing me about my older lover. I saw the man again, a few weeks later, and he smirked at me and wiggled his finger for me to come closer. Thankfully I was with a friend and we kept walking until we were out of sight, where I called the police. It was probably the scariest encounter with street harassment in my life, maybe because of my age.

I've got your back!
32+

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demonstration, Story, Verbal

Koko’s Story: Creepers in the park

03/05/14 about midday I was walking through Primrose Hill park and two creepy guys lounging on a bench started wolf whistling at me in front of loads of families and kids, I was so angry and frustrated.

I've got your back!
15+

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demonstration, Verbal

Anon’s Story: “I’m sick of not feeling safe, absolutely everywhere”

Driving home from work in my car, guys pull up next to me at the lights and begin yelling out the window (no actual words that I could hear, just loud noises, but intimidating). I stared straight ahead, not moving, not changing my expression, nothing. No reaction. So they began waving their arms at me, revving their engine and screaming ‘filthy slut’, among other things, for about a minute until the lights changed. They then sped off, screeching around the corner out of control, across two lanes.

Apparently can’t even drive my own vehicle now without being harassed with such anger and venom behind it. Btw, not that it should matter but I was wearing jeans/jumper. Goes to show harassment seems to happen purely because we’re female, no other reason. Clothing, time, place, doesn’t even matter. I’m sick of not feeling safe, absolutely everywhere.

I've got your back!
11+

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demonstration, Nonverbal Harassment, Story

Lisa’s Story: A Success Story!

I’ve been a fan of Hollaback for about a year now, and I finally decided to share a story. There are so many experiences of harassers getting away with their words and/or actions, and leaving the victim feeling powerless and trapped. However, I am happy to say that this is a success story!

I work in an industrial neighborhood in the East Bay, California. Every morning, I take a walk in about a one-mile radius from my workplace. There is a tow-truck company whose trucks frequent the area quite often, as their headquarters are nearby.

Beginning around October of last year, there was one particular driver for the company who, everytime he saw me walking, would blare his horn. A shrill, jarring, airhorn-like sound. Truck horns are designed to startle someone in an urgent situation, and naturally when this first started occurring, I would immediately look towards the sound to see what was happening. When I looked, the driver would have this grin across his face that felt so… Invasive. Sometimes he would wave, as well. My standard reaction was to flip him off, but that wasn’t satisfying the need to make him feel the way that he made me feel. Cornered, on display. I should throw in that this would always happen when he was driving by (in motion), and never when he was stopped. Big surprise, I know.

A few months later, another driver for the company started honking, grinning, waving, etc. as he passed. This happened several times. Everytime an instance occurred with this company, it was one of those two drivers. They were always in separate vehicles, never together at the same time.

So, I began to recognize my options. I thought about notifying the police, but I then realized that harassment in the workplace is taken much more seriously, internally speaking. If a company discovers that one of their employees is harassing others inside or outside of the workplace, there are often serious repercussions. I decided to call the company.

I immediately- but non-confrontationally- asked to speak to a manager. I told the receptionist that I had been experiencing harassment from two of their employees for approximately four months, and that I was fairly confident the company was unaware that this was happening. The woman I spoke to seemed to understand the urgency, and transferred me to the manager’s phone line. He was not in the office, but I did seize the opportunity to leave an in-depth message. I addressed everything that had happened with the honking and smiling, and let him know how these actions affected my feelings and sense of safety. I noted the times that these instances occurred, and the drivers’ appearances.

I never did receive a phone call back from the company, but I am ecstatic to say that not one single harassment incident, from either driver, has occurred since. I still see the same drivers when I go for a walk, and they will look, but will not say or do a thing. In fact, the majority of the time, they can’t even look me in the eye anymore.

People need to know that they CAN make a difference. They DO have the power to change things. They need not be afraid to use their voice and take action. The harassers do not have any more power than those who are harassed, and this story proves that those who choose to victimize others will endure justified consequences, if we speak up!

I've got your back!
20+

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A Week in Our Shoes

Week In Our Shoes: Make Way for May Edition

Hey Hollabackers!

                            Hollaback! Ottawa’s Video Shoot:
       “How will you address gender-based violence in Ottawa?”

This week, Hollaback! was featured in BuzzfeedThe Independent, Hull Daily Mail, and Behance.

Here’s what HOLLAs around the world have been up to:

Hollaback! Appalachian Ohio has started a photography series titled Body Hair Hoopla, and is calling out to all self-identified females with body hair. The event states, “We believe everyone has the right to do whatever they want with their body without criticism. If you wanna shave, awesome! If you don’t wanna shave, awesome!..Hollaback wants to highlight an alternative view of femininity and beauty (or maybe just raise a middle finger to society’s expectations, depending on how you wanna frame it!)”.

Hollaback! Baltimore was at a Take Back the Night event and will be at Gouchella today as a Community Ally for this event put on by Goucher College’s Feminist Collective. Also! Tatyana Fazlalizadeh put up her first poster in the Baltimore series of the Stop Telling Women to Smile project and it features three women that were at their event last week, including Site Leader, Mel. So cool! 

Hollaback! Boston presented a Hollaback! 101 workshop at Northeastern University’s Cabral Center for a free summit for youth, adults, survivors and allies called Raise Your Voice. Various organizations were there talking about intervention and prevention strategies, celebrating survivors of sexual violence and work being done to make Boston safe for everyone.

Hollaback! Chennai shared this great interview with Sandy’s Chocolate Laboratory, one of the local businesses that have signed on to Hollaback! Chennai’s Safer Spaces campaign and has made a visible commitment to ‘zero tolerance’ of sexual harassment at their place of business.

Hollaback! Cleveland visited St. Martin De Porres to support their Take Back the Night event. They were also on WRUW-fm’s By the Bi discussing street harassment and their launch as a new site. The recording will soon be available to listen here.

Hollaback! Edinburgh presented at this year’s Pussy Whipped Edinburgh Festival.

Hollaback! Hull University held their official launch party. Woohoo! And they were on BBC Radio Humberside to talk about their launch. Listen to the podcast here (Reportage and interview start at 01:09:43).

Hollaback! Montreal celebrated the publication of the eighth edition of Subversions: A Journal of Feminist Queries; a collection of student visual art, creative writing and academic pieces from the Simone de Beauvoir Institute community and beyond!

Hollaback! Ottawa, as part of their ongoing campaign to see gender-based violence prioritized in the upcoming municipal election, held a video shoot (pictured above!) highlighting community member’s thoughts on what they want candidates to do about gender-based violence in Ottawa and how they want gender-based violence to be addressed.

Hollaback! Plattsburgh was at SUNY Plattsburgh’s Take Back the Night event.

Hollaback! Twin Cities‘ Site director, Ami Wazlawik, was chosen as Minnesota NOW’s Feminist of the Year 2014! Congrats, Ami!

Inspiring work, as always! Happy May, everyone! Til next week,

HOLLA and out!

– The Hollaback! Team

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demonstration, Stalking, transphobic, Verbal

Hm’s Story: It’s not a compliment

I was walking into the Target on the corner with two friends. I was wearing a dress. I heard a male voice behind me say that he loved the dress and I ignored him. He followed my friends and I further into the store and kept saying “hey you in the dress,” but I ignored him. Finally I without looking told him to fuck off. He started being like “fuck off, all I wanted to do was compliment you!!!” I turned around at that and he looked physically threatening so I walked with my friends further into the store. The store was crowded, there were employees everywhere but no one said a thing.

I've got your back!
44+

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Story, transphobic, Verbal

Charlotte’s Story: “gone by the time I turned the corner”

I go to The University of Texas in Austin and it’s hella expensive to park your car on campus. Usually I just park my car across 35 and take the shuttle back to campus, but I had just gotten back to town and it was a Sunday, so the shuttle wasn’t running a full schedule. Because the next bus wouldn’t arrive for another 45 minutes (and because it was early March and 30 degrees outside), I decided to walk back to campus rather than wait.

I was walking down MLK, having almost made it back to my dorm without incident, when a silver PT cruiser sped past me. Some guy stuck his head out the window and yelled “SLUT,” started laughing, and pulled his head back into the car.

They turned onto the same street as my dorm and I tried to chase after them, but they were gone by the time I turned the corner.

I've got your back!
43+

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demonstration, transphobic, Verbal

E’s Story: Coffee shop harasser

The guy in the photo below decided that he wanted to talk to me at the cafe that both of us happen to be at twenty minutes ago so he said hi. I ignored him, he said hi again then a few more times. I ignored him & stayed focused on the book I was reading. He said, “ok,” then started waving he hand in my face to get my attention. I still ignored him. Then he touched me on the shoulder while laughing & said ok. I then said, “Fuck you.” Then I walked to the barista and complained. She said, “he’s a regular, he’s here all the time but I’m sorry that that happened & I’ll tell the guys (that work there). And I took his photo & said that this is for Hollaback. He left the establishment.

I've got your back!
65+

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demonstration, public masturbation, Stalking, transphobic, Verbal

Andrea’s Story: Shocked and Disgusted

At around 8:30 am while waiting for the downtown J train at Bowery I was followed and watched by a man who began masturbating. He stood about 20 feet away from me on the same platform. He looked right into my eyes. Thankfully, my train arrived soon after. I called 311 but was on the line for 15 minutes with no response so I gave up. Unfortunately, I was too shocked and disgusted to give this sexist pig a big FUCK YOU. Thank you, you fucking jerkoff, for ruining my Saturday.

I've got your back!
40+

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