Verbal

It’s not a compliment, it’s harassment

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The Movement

Two women’s stories of harassment

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event

Hollaback!: Feminist Responses to Street Harassment panel at Barnard!

Please join us as we talk about the revolution at Barnard on Monday, October 25th at 6:30pm!

Speakers include: Emily May from Hollaback!, Shannon Lynberg and Chai Shenoy from HollabackDC, and Oraia Reid from RightRides.

Here’s the description: Street harassment, or sexual harassment in public spaces, is an issue with which just about every woman has some experience. Activists from New York City and Washington, DC will discuss new, innovative ways to combat street harassment using technology, mapping, and community organizing. Through online activism, public policy and advocacy, and outreach, these activists have succeeded in giving people from many different communities a forum in which they can speak out against gender-based street harassment.

For more details, click on the facebook invite here. Spread the word by inviting your friends.

See you there!

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Verbal

Dude. Not cool. (It works!)

Since I moved to New York City from the Midwest four months ago, I’ve been harassed almost every day. I always just try to ignore it. Tonight, I was walking down Seventh Avenue to meet my parents and boyfriend for dinner, when an older guy yelled, “Hey gorgeous, anyone ever tell you you’re beautiful?” As usual, I ignored him and kept walking, but the guy kept following me, yelling out, “Hey beautiful, c’mere,” and the usual stuff like that. I started to get a little scared; the route I’d planned would take me down a quiet street, away from bystanders and lights, and he was still following me closely.

I stopped to wait to cross the street, and the guy stopped with me, still catcalling. Without planning to, I looked the guy straight in the eye, glared, held up my hand, and said, “Dude. Not cool. Go somewhere else.” He looked startled, and I said something like, “You shouldn’t bother people like that. Go away and leave me alone.” I made a shooing gesture–and he left! He turned right around and crossed the street, away from me. I couldn’t believe that it had worked–or that I’d stood up for myself like that!

Thanks for letting me share my story, and for helping me find the confidence to Hollaback. Maybe that guy will think twice before he harasses someone else.

Submitted by Hannah

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Verbal

“Smile!”

“Hello.. beautiful, gorgeous..” This guy tried to bother me & my friend and a young woman 15 ft. behind us. I turned around, “Smile!” He said if we waited he’ll take off his shirt.

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Uncategorized

Upskirted

I was sitting on the train one day and had my ipod on blast not paying attention to anything, mind you that day I decided to wear a skirt, a guy walks in wearing a yankees hat very low to hide his face i found this very strange, he sat across from me and was looking at me for a period of time . I noticed his arms were low and i looked at his hands , there I saw a camera phone, i had just been up skirted. I was I shocked I did not know what to do .

Submitted by Michelle

one comment 
groping

Walgreens

When I was 17 years old (five years ago), I was in a Walgreens Drug Store purchasing a beverage. There was an older male employee there that I would see often and chat with him occasionally regarding the weather and such innocuous subjects.

This particular afternoon, he was restocking the beverages and I commented on how cold I was. He looked at me, laughed, and lunged forward… he wrapped his arms around me and said, “Let me warm you up, baby!”

After I managed to break free from his grasp, I left and never returned to that particular Walgreens again. At the time, I was naive teenager and the first thing I thought to myself was “What did *I* do to cause this to happen to me? What did *I* do that made him think it was all right to grab me in such a way?” I cried for a few hours over my lost dignity and respect, and it has still haunted me. Not until I came across Hollaback! did I realize I could do something. Thank you.

Submitted by Emily

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Verbal

Men at Work: An idea for getting them to stop harassing you

I have lived in NYC my whole life and as a girl have had to deal with this harassment for years. I always tried every solution to deal with this from yelling back to ignoring. I wanted to share one solution I started a few years ago and have been telling everyone. If you are harassed by a man in a van or car with a company name on it write down the license plate and call the company. Do the same thing with anyone in work clothes with the name of the company. I have spoken to supervisors who are very angry and have let men go over this.

I will be submitting photos of the men who are not in company cars/vans and company clothes here. Great idea!

Submitted by Elspeth

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The Movement

NYC Council Hearing on Street Harassment!

Pop the bubbly, it’s Friday afternoon and we’ve got killer news. The NYC Council’s Committee on Women’s Issues is holding a hearing on “Street Harassment of Women and Girls.” Why?

Because you holla’ed back, and they listened.

One incredible woman, named Elizabeth Mendez Barry, holla’ed in El Diario (read it in English, here).  Her op-ed, called “Street Harassment, the uncomfortable walk home,” inspired the city council, along with complaints from school administrators, to take action. Her bold act reminds us of the importance of using our voices to speak out, and of the power of the op-ed.  To learn how to write your own op-ed, visit The Op-Ed Project.  In the words of Holly Kearl from Stop Street Harassment, “it changed my life.”

The hearing will take place on Thursday, October 28th, 2010 at 1pm in the 14th floor committee room at 250 Broadway. We want to pack the room.  If you are willing to tell your story to the city council, please reach out to us. We’re happy to help you develop your testimony if you’ve never done it before. If you just want to show up in solidarity on your lunch hour, that would be rad too.

This is an incredible opportunity to push your hollabacks off the computer screen and in front of legislators. Women represent 50% of the voting block, and legislators already know that making powerful waves on this will be good for their political careers. But what they don’t know is the extent to which this is happening, and how incredibly important this issue is.    That’s our job.   We’ve got to ban together and seize this opportunity.

If you’re interested in being a part of this, reach out to Emily May at emily@ihollaback.org If you can’t be there — tell us what changes you’d like to see in this city, below.

HOLLA!

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Verbal

You are what you wear. And girl, you are a power suit!

Dressed in my finest power suit, I walked along a tree-lined street in cobble hill, the sun was shining and I felt great as I mentally prepared for my interview. As I passed a brownstone where people were unloading party supplies from a Party Rental LTD truck, you know the one with the pink hippo painted on the trucks, one of the delivery men came close to me and whispered in his best husky voice “hey sexy, i would want to get to know you”, I was shocked, for  some silly reason I thought no street predator could possibly bother a woman in a power suit… Normally, I would walk away fuming or give the jerk a dirty look, but I was my power suit damn it, so I walked up to this man and asked him his name and why he felt it was acceptable to degrade women. Robert (no last name) covered his work badge, and cowered away yelling out apologies as I threaten to call his company and report him. Funny enough I drew a mob of woman backing me up – the solidarity of women (and hopefully the firing of Robert) left me feeling empowered, but sadly, this is only one jerk that may second guess harassing women.

Submitted by Gina

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