Verbal

If street harassment is supposed to be a dating tactic, it’s a terrible one.

Middle aged guy in white Boston hoodie, with green letters and a shamrock got up in my face and growled, “you wanna go on a date?!”

Submitted by Megan

Sorry, Boston, for the bad PR. We know he sucks, too. How about a little show of support today? $5 will do the trick.

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Assault

It gets better… but let’s face it. Being gay isn’t easy.

First, THANK YOU for initiating this movement. I have experienced street attacks on multiple occasions ranging from the words “queer” and “dyke” to having golf balls thrown at me.

I have also experienced a gang attack where people wrote phrases and pictures all over my body while others watched — this was in a home and was never prosecuted. The pictures involved drawings of penises, breasts, and words such as “eat me,” “cunt,” and “enter here.” This evening also involved a rape.

Although this happened in a home and not on the street I bring this up because a) it was unprosecuted suggesting that it is that much more imperative that “we the people” take our streets back, b) it involved bystanders who did nothing, so your movement to get others involved with doing the right thing is encouraging.

I am an activist in my community in Lansing, Michigan — wearing many hats working with teens who are homeless, teens who are bullied (and inactive bystanders), and LGBTIQ youth.

Submitted by Veronica

If verbal harassment is okay, then groping is okay. If groping is okay then violence is okay…where is your boundary? IT ISN’T FREE SPEECH IF SOMEONE IS GETTING HURT. Help us today, show your support with a $5 donation. Thank you.

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Street harassment in the media

Hollaback on WPIX with friends!

With shout-outs to our partners in crime, the Astronomical Kid, War Zone, and Walking Home.

Enjoy this video clip? Did you snort out loud when Emily says “BUT YOU CAN’T EVEN SEE MY BLEEP!”? Help us reach more people, with more video clips! You can, with $5.

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Uncategorized

Hollaback on MSNBC!

“Stop looking at my moms!” There are 1001 creative ways to say NO to street harassment. Come up with your own, and then say it with $5.

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Uncategorized

The iPhone app is here!

Finally! We are so proud to announce that the iPhone app is in stores.  This app was funded by 356 donors, and we are so, so grateful for their support.  Download it today, here!

The Droid app will be coming out within the next few days, stay tuned!

Like the app??? Want more??? Say it with another 99c. (or $5, but you get the picture.)

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Verbal

The Power of Power

Erik Kondo runs a nonprofit called NOT-ME!. He is a tremendous ally in the movement to end street harassment and recently developed this blog, loaded with resources on how to deal with street harassment. He also sent us the following story where he describes the harassment he receives because of his disability. Although we primarily focus on sexual harassment, this story is a powerful reminder that harassment is about power, in its many, many forms. Whether that is power related to your gender, your race, your class, your abilities, your weight, your age, or whatever, it’s still about power.
Here’s Erik’s story:
Yesterday I went for a short bike ride. I ride a two-wheeled handed cycle that is the height of a standard recumbent bicycle. During that period of time, I received three unsolicited comments:
1. A middle aged women in a car on her phone yelled at me as I rode by “GET A FLAG!!!”
2. A male biker said “That looks hard.”
3. Some kids yelled “Wow, cool bike.”
My responses were as follows:
1. The Finger
2. “It’s not, really”
3. A wave
Here is my point, regardless of whether or not I should have a flag on my bicycle: it is DISRESPECTFUL to yell at me. And I don’t like it. And I don’t care or want to hear the driver’s opinion even if it is good advice. It is OBNOXIOUS AND RUDE to make unsolicited comments to people you don’t know.
The 2nd issue is WHY this woman choose to yell at ME. I don’t believe that this woman yells at all men on recumbent bicycles. She was comfortable yelling at me because she saw it was a handcycle and therefore, I was not threatening to her. So she yelled.
What I am getting at is this issue of disrespect is something that most men can relate to. They get it. They know when someone is doing it to them. You want to get men to understand that unsolicited comments to women that they don’t know, regardless of whether they are complimentary or not, is disrespectful and inappropriate behavior. This is an effective strategy for going after the “Charmer Wannabe”-type harasser and the “Peacocking Showoff” [for definitions of these types of harassers and others, please see Erik's work here]. Trying to paint these men as “sexual terrorists” will only alienate potential male allies.
From the male viewpoint, there is nothing more ego-inflating than a bunch of young women you don’t know publicly commenting on how good you look. In fact, I would say that for the average guy, a car load of women driving by hooting and hollering at him would be the highlight of his day/week/year. He would proudly tell all his male friends about it. But if he felt that the women were being disrespectful to him, he would be furious and embarrassed.
Therefore, I am saying that focusing on how SH makes women feel is much more powerful than focusing on the specifics of the behavior.
For creating SH-free zones, I suggest not trying to ban specific actions such as hooting & hollering. Make them DISRESPECT-free zones—or RESPECT zones—where any type of disrespectful behavior to girls and women is not tolerated.
Ever been shouted at like Erik for the way you look, the way you were dressed, or the way you were breathing? Help us give those wankers a real run for their money. Do it with $5.

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Verbal

Sick? You are, and I’m not gonna put up with it.

I was in the elevator at work, coming back from lunch, when I encountered a dude who randomly started talking to me while I was zoning out on phone. First, he called me “toots,” and then he made a kissy face at me. When he asked me how I was doing (my reply: “Just trying to ride the elevator, man”) he smiled and backed me into the corner. Then, his coworker (oh right. Because there were other people in the elevator) said “Oh, haha, just ignore him, he’s sick,” and my new friend leaned in so close I could actually feel his breath on me and said “Is that how you like it? Sick? You into that?” Then he grabbed my badge out of my hands and said “Where do you work?” before butchering the name of my company and sliding off the elevator (which, incidentally, I ride with him roughly twice a week. He works on the floor below mine).

Last week, I ran into him again. This time he oggled me all the way up to his stop, then leaned into my face and said “BYE!” like a 13 year old mean girl, before stepping off the elevator. On a whim, I followed him. He looked startled. “I’m coming with you today,” I said. He looked me up and down. “Lucky me,” he said.

He was a lot less cocky about 10 minutes later, after I’d followed him to his office, demanded to speak to his supervisor, and told his boss – and his boss’ boss – that the next time New Friend tried to make a love connection with me, I’d be calling the cops.

Submitted by Mads

Does this awesome hollaback make you wanna stand up from your desk and throw a few fist pumps in the air? How about donating to show your support? Say it with $5.

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The Movement

Meet Anna from HollabackFRANCE!

Anna is just one of the people who are planning to start Hollabacks in their own communities. Help support their work by starting a page, setting a goal, and asking your friends to donate at my.ihollaback.org.

We’ll be introducing you to more of the Hollaback leaders over the coming weeks. Stay tuned, and THANK YOU for your ongoing support.

Live in France like Anna? Italy? Germany? We want to help you bring Hollaback to your country, too, but we need a little help. Give us a push, with $5.

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The Movement

Advice on dealing with racial and sexual harassment: BE STRONG LADIES

I’ve live in NYC my whole life and I’ve experienced both sexual verbal harassment and racism almost all the time. I get unwanted stares on a daily basis, but you know what, as a woman you should learn to fight back and protect yourself. I’ve learned some ways to scare those harassers off. Do whatever you can to protect yourself, if you feel like a creep is following you, act like a psycho, start talking to yourself and w/e, cause no one wanna mess with a psycho and carry a pepper spray.

My ways of handling these situations are always having my IPOD on, so i can’t hear those whistles or catcalls, i can easily ignore them if i don’t hear it, all that’s left is them looking like idiots if you can’t hear them.

When some creep is staring at me nonstop, i’ll look back with a very angry scary looking pisst off face, like the kind u don’t wanna mess with, that’ll sure to ruin whatever fantasy they’re having, and if i have to, i’ll curse at them.

The more women act scared, the more they will harass you, you gotta teach yourself to act like you’re a demon and no one can touch you, don’t be the one who’s scared, be the one to scare!!! take good notes from those ghetto black teenage girls, there’s a reason why no one wants to deal with them.

BE STRONG LADIES, YOU’VE ONLY GOT YOURSELF AND YOUR ONE PRECIOUS LIFE, FIGHT BACK LIKE YOUR LIFE IS ON THE LINE, DON’T LOSE TO ANYONE!!!

Submitted by Cheryl

Ever stood up for yourself like Cheryl did? It feels great, right?!? Help others find the courage to do the same! You can, with $5.

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groping

Does this look like a locker room to you?

I was leaving the subway station, and getting onto the escalator and i hear people shouting thigs at me like heyy mami, hey sexy, and I turn around and see about 10 guys. Annoyed, I start walking up the escalator, only to hear cheering. I turned around and see one of the guys directly behind me. I gave him a dirty look and kept walking. All of a sudden i feel a hang slap my ass. I turned around and yell in the guys face, “are you kidding me?,” and kept walking, trying to get away from them. The guys kept cheering and cat calling all the way to the street exit, at witch point they followed me out, saying, “ohh were going the same way.” I began to get nervous and called my boyfriend who was a few blocks away. As the phone was ringing, i feel another hand hitting me on the ass. I wheeled around and the guys all said heyy heyyy heyy and kept saying things to me, cat calling. I quickened my pace but a few of them followed me around the corner, and kept asking me where i was going and what my name was, as i yelled at them that i don’t speak english, at which point i thankfully saw my boyfriend who had run outside, and the guys immediately crossed the street and kept walking.

Submitted by J

There’s sometimes an unclear line between free speech and verbal harassment that makes many women hesitant to take action against their harassers. There’s no fine line between free speech and slapping a stranger on the ass, though. That’s illegal and we’re sick of it. Help us tell the city we won’t tolerate it. You can, with $5.

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