Uncategorized

Turning the Tables on Street Harassment : Kitty Kat Kalling

Check out this video where two women turn the tables on street harassment, Holla’ing at men on the street.  Katie, one of the writers of the video, says:

“We wanted to turn the tables and see how men would feel if we “holla-ed” at them! Our parody pulls from real life experience and we hope that the video brings attention to the inappropriateness of cat calling. It’s time for men to get a taste of their own medicine, but in a light-hearted, funny way (even though cat calling is a serious issue!)”

Check it out below!

What do you think?

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Story, Verbal

HOLLA ON THE GO: Creeper on the walk home

A man said “I’d lick that pussy baby” to me while I was walking home through my neighborhood. I didn’t respond or react at all, just gave him a dirty look.

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67+

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demonstration, Nonverbal Harassment, Story, Verbal

Megan’s Story: “It pisses me off that they got away with it”

I was walking from class home when these two guys yelled at me from the car. something about wanting to “break me”. I just gave them a dirty look and kept walking. By the time they had circled back I was livid. When they yelled more obscenities at me I flipped them off. That’s when they threw the bottle at me. I was so shocked at being hit and worried about the broken glass when it hit the concrete that I didn’t get the license plate number. It pisses me off that they got away with it.

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71+

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Story, Uncategorized

HOLLA ON THE GO: Not a nice way to start the workday

Some asshole just called me a whore from his truck. Nice way to end the workday.

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42+

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Uncategorized

Week In Our Shoes: #Harassmentis Edition

photo-11Hello Hollabackers!

This week Hollaback! was featured by Awkward Inquiries, The Examiner, Athens News, and Athens Ohio Today. Hollaback! launched “Harassment Is: An exploration of identity and street harassment” as a part of our #HarassmentIs campaign, alongside our “harassment-is” tumblr page, for people to post photos or vlogs of what “harassment is” and expand the conversation on street harassment. On October 17th, Hollaback! hosted a tweet up, where people were invited to discuss what #harassmentis to them and on October 18th, Hollaback chalked up Washington Square Park for the #harassmentis chalk walk. Whew! What a week.

 

Here’s what the HOLLAs around the world have been up to:

Hollaback! Chennai recently partnered with Vivanta by Taj – Connemara for five exciting editions of Hollaback! Fridays. These events, which took place on ‘ladies’ night’ at the hotel’s bar, Distil, featured live music by local female-fronted bands, with handouts on street sexual harassment being distributed with every bill. Hollaback! Chennai volunteers also approached patrons at these events and asked them to complete the sentence, ‘I Hollaback! because…’ in their own words; they were then asked to write the sentence on a piece of paper and pose for a photo while holding the paper with their message.

Hollaback Appalachian Ohio  in addition to receiving some great press coverage, participated in a rally and march, F–CK RAPE CULTURE.  The event caused quite a stir when “almost 100 men and women marched through the streets of Athens to push back against campus rape culture.”

Hollaback Hamilton is leading two workshops this weekend about political activism at the Hamilton Leadership Summit for Women – a YWCA and McMaster University Initiative.

 

HOLLA and out!

-The Hollaback! Team

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Story, Uncategorized

HOLLA ON THE GO: Bike by harassment

When I was walking down the street to get some groceries, one of the three bicycling brats screamed at my ear and rest of then laughed at me as they passed by.

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25+

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demonstration

Jill’s Story: “He ruined that show for me”

I went to Warped Tour in 2010 wearing shorts and a tank top (because it was July and super-hot out!) and I was incredibly excited to see Sum 41 perform. During their performance, I was enjoying the music, jumping up and down, hands in the air, singing along when I heard a low, growling voice in my right ear say “Yeah, keep jumping.” I was immediately petrified. I stopped jumping and moved away from my cousin, the only person I was with, to try and disappear into the crowd and lose this man who had spoken to me. I was too scared to turn around and look at him, so I have no idea who he was or anything about him other than the fact that he was a total creep. He ruined that show for me, and I felt so ashamed that I didn’t even tell my cousin about it later. It’s absolutely unacceptable that I shouldn’t be allowed to fully immerse myself in a performance of one of my favorite musical artists because I have to worry about some dude watching me enjoy it in an unquestionably sinister way, and its completely ridiculous that I should feel ashamed of letting loose and jumping up and down.

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31+

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demonstration, Story

Melissa’s Story: #harassmentis response

Hi. I am a pre-op transsexual woman living in West Hartford, Connecticut. I shared my story in 2011 and shared a follow up story this year (2013).

I was reading Hollaback’s #HarassmentIs and felt inspired to share more experiences.

Ableism-

I was pumping gas at a local gas station when a young man pumping gas in front of me read that I looked like I didn’t work. He turned to another young man, whom he did not know, who was at a different pump and said, loudly, “How was work?” To which the other young man replied, sarcastically, “Oh, It was great.”

I was at the local post office and accidentally, momentarily, messed my transaction up while there were several people waiting. While my transaction resolved itself, two men, at least one of them younger, who were behind me in line, were able to finish before me. When I got back to my car, someone had put an additional 4 quarters in my parking meter. Evidently, they somehow knew which car was mine, which felt creepy, because they had to be watching or keeping track of me getting out of my car, which is bizarre, because who does that?

Classism -

In #HarassmentIs only one page was devoted to street harassment based on class, and it only talked about people who are, or are perceived to be wealthy, harassing people who are, or who are perceived to be poor.

I look like I have money and I have received a tremendous amount of verbal abuse (in a predominantly wealthy area), for being perceived to have wealth.

Two weeks ago, I made a trip to West Hartford center on a Monday mid-afternoon. It is a place where wealthy appearing women will occasionally walk around. I got out of my car, put a couple of quarters in my meter and began walking toward Starbucks. I had not planned to go inside and was going to walk by and, eventually, cross the street. Less than halfway to Starbucks I came upon a man who was already harassing a woman because she had a nice car (black Lexus? SUV). She was responding to him, it seemed she was trying to comfort him. When I encountered him he was saying to her in a very loud and angry tone of voice “thousand dollar a month car!” Then he saw me and his eyes went to my shoes, which were nice booties and he became even more angry the moment he looked at my shoes. He turned back to her and said, even louder. “Thousand dollar a month car payment, thousand dollar a month (unintelligible)! You’ve got car insurance, health insurance, while the rest of us are eating popcorn. By this time I was pretty distant, and he called after me – “Yeah, keep walking!” Needless to say my trip to West Hartford center was very short. Just before I got into my car I saw him sitting himself down angrily outside Starbucks.

In 2010 I was at the cafe at Barnes and Noble and I sat down in the back of the cafe to read. As soon as I sat down, a man who was seated diagonally across from me, who was talking with a woman, bristled. He was looking at me and he said, loudly, “Spain. Yeah Spain’s got problems. My mother in law is from Spain.” He kept talking and getting louder and I had to leave the cafe.

Also in 2010 I had three separate experiences which were so similar they were shocking. In May, I was in West Hartford center and a young man who was with another  man said loudly to me “That’s not real!” In August I was at the DMV in a neighboring town and a young woman who was with her male partner said, as she passed me, “That’s unreal.” Lastly, sometime later in the fall, a young man working at Whole Foods, said to me as he saw me “Is that real?”

- to clarify – Yes. It’s real.

I was in Blue Back Square on a Sunday recently and I sat down on an out of the way bench. A car of young boys drove by and I heard one of them shout “It looks like you have a secret life!” And then drive on.

Earlier this year I was at the Barnes and Noble cafe (which I do not go to any longer) and an unstable woman had an outburst. She perceived me to be gay (which I’m not), and started asking an employee if he was going to be a “Boy Scout troop leader?” He played along with her and offered “Did I tell you that I’m rich?”

- I think what is interesting about the harassment based on classism is that a few years ago I blended right in, wearing some of the same clothes. Everyone here looked like they had money (whether they actually did or not) and no one ever bothered me for looking like I had money. Recently I’ve received a tremendous amount of flak for at least appearing to be wealthy. So it was understandable that when I read the #HarassmentIs booklet that Hollaback depicted examples of wealthy people harassing poorer people, however, it ran completely contrary to my experiences. I have never harassed someone verbally, for any reason.

Gender Identity Photo-Op -

As I said, I am a pre-op transsexual woman, so I dress the part. I have a wonderful wardrobe with lots of shoes, beautiful dresses, a fair amount of jewelry and plenty of color.

I have had my photo taken, with my knowledge (but without my consent), 5 different times.

One was a photo taken by a young teenage girl from a car that she asked her friend to slow down as I walked down the street.

A second was a young twenty-something taking my photo as I sat near a statue in West Hartford Center.

A third was another young twenty-something taking my picture as I sat on a bench in West Hartford center.

A fourth was, yet another young twenty-something, taking my photo at the same spot as the previous.

Lastly, this Sunday a grown, middle-aged woman snapped a photo with flash in Blue Back Square. She was with her family. (I hear it’s a great way to teach the kids).

- It is interesting to note that all of the people who took my photo (over the last 3 years) were women, and four of them were twenty-something or younger.

I must be a Facebook celebrity, but I don’t know it.

I wanted to write these things because that is what came to mind after reading #HarassmentIs. I think that our current culture is about punishment and critical judgement of others. When a person doesn’t fit in to generalized norms, they are immediately criticized, judged and then punished.

Speaking for myself, I am just trying to relax.

It does not matter where you are or what you are trying to do, you shouldn’t be punished for it, unless it causes avoidable harm to others.

I am very sorry for my length, and I hope you can include this on your website. Once again, thank you for providing a place to express these things.

Melissa

I've got your back!
23+

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The Movement, Uncategorized

Hollaback!’s #HarassmentIs Media Advisory

HOLLABACK! LAUNCHES #HARASSMENTIS: AN EXPLORATION OF IDENTITY AND STREET HARASSMENT

The guide, tumblr, tweetup, and chalkwalk seek to fill a gap in the global conversation about street harassment.

NEW YORK CITY, NY. Today Hollaback! releases their newest publication, “#HarassmentIs: an exploration of identity and street harassment” to inspire a broader understanding of how identity can impact the experience of harassment.

“Street harassment is a global problem and we need to understand what it looks like and feels like for everybody if we want it erased from our daily lives,” said Debjani Roy, Deputy Director of Hollaback! and one of the authors of #HarassmentIs.

 To inspire others to join the conversation, Hollaback! also launched a #HarassmentIs tumblr today and is hosting a tweetup on Thursday, October 17th at 1pm EDT using the hashtag #HarassmentIs.  A chalk walk will take place on Friday, October 18th at 3pm in Washington Square Park, NYC, where Debjani Roy, co-author of #HarassmentIs will be available for interviews. Participants are invited to share ways in which their experiences of street harassment have been informed by their gender, race, sexuality, ability, size, and/or class.

Responding to #HarassmentIs, writer and activist Soraya Chemaly says, “Street harassment is not about sex. It’s not about flattery. It’s about power and relies, ultimately, on intimidation and the threat of violence [...] Entitlement to violence and the normative control of women and nonconforming minorities in public space is what is at the heart of street harassment.”

Want more information?  Check out the #harassmentis guide or send us an email at: holla@ihollaback.org

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Verbal

z. beck’s Story: “How does one go about combating this unacceptable behaviour?”

Locked my bike up in its usual spot outside the home of a dog I walk. Some guy on the sidewalk was crossing the street in the same direction I was. He sat on some steps on the far side of the street, and I passed, just going about my day. He called out “Hey!” in a low tone. I figured he was just saying hey, as people around here often do in passing, or was making an attempt to beg for money (which happens so often I do tend to ignore it/pretend I didn’t hear). When I didn’t respond, he added “I want to shove my c0ck in you.” I was shocked and thrown off. I’ve been whistled at before, but never victim to verbal attacks like this. He further added “I have to punish you” in an even softer tone.

I hurried to my destination and sat inside for about ten minutes, hoping by the time I went out again to walk the dog, he’d be gone. Thankfully he was.

This happened at an intersection across from a school, which makes it even scarier. I’m trying to find a way to report it, but I didn’t even get a look at him.

My biggest concern is being too afraid to respond in a reprimanding way for fear of being physically assaulted as a result. So how, then, does one go about combating this unacceptable behaviour?

I've got your back!
26+

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