Story, Verbal

Sharon’s story: “He got the last word. Until now.”

Guy walking by me on Fort Totten Metro platform: You are so pretty. You sexy too.
(I give him the stink-eye. He keeps walking.)
Harasser: I was just giving you a compliment.
Me: That’s not a compliment.
Harasser: I just said you’re pretty.
Me: That’s not a compliment.
Harasser (walks back over to me): I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to be disrespectful.
Me: When you comment on a woman’s looks without her asking you, it’s disrespectful.
Harasser: It was a compliment. You’re supposed to say, “thank you”.
Me: That’s not a compliment. When you comment on a woman’s looks without her asking, it’s disrespectful, it’s not a compliment.
Harasser: Where you from?
Me: I don’t have to talk to you.
Harasser: When someone gives you a compliment, you’re supposed to say “thank you”.
Me: That’s not a compliment when you comment on a woman’s body without her asking you.
Harasser: How many women you think ask “How do I look today?” Next time say thank you.
Me: No. It’s not a compliment.
(Harasser starts to walk away)
Harasser: Just because you pretty don’t mean you smart. Think before you speak next time. Dumb bitch.

I’ve been harassed on the street many, many times, and it felt good to respond in that moment. But he got the last word. Until now.

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120+

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Story

Annalise’s story: Photo shoot

My best friend and I were at Union Station taking photos for her school project when a man yelled across a large aisle to us, asking if we were photographers in an obviously mocking voice. We immediately became hesitant, but I answered and said we were just taking pictures for school. He then came closer and asked us if we’d take a picture of him, we told him some reason why we couldn’t and he followed us as we headed to the ballroom area, asking us questions the entire way. When we got back to ballroom entrance, we found that we were completely alone with the man, who was easily 4 years older than us and 50 pounds larger. He asked us if we had boyfriends, if we wanted to hang with him and his friends, have a drink, etc, and when we said no to all of it, he said something along the lines of “Y’all are good girls then, huh?” and stepped closer. I don’t remember what made him leave, but finally he wandered off. We haven’t been back there since, but if I do go back, at least now I’m old enough to carry the pepper spray that would have helped me feel safer in that situation.

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84+

 

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Uncategorized, What Hollaback Means to Me

What Hollaback Means to Me: Rita’s story

BY RITA PASARELL

When I heard of Hollaback a few years ago, my first thought was: “finally!”  I was so glad to see a place for people to share their stories and speak out against street harassment— a place where the issue was taken seriously.

I remember thinking back to when I was repeatedly, loudly,aggressively street harassed for almost two years by a neighbor who was more than twice my age. After many confrontations where I told him to leave me alone,I became so fed up that I decided to report him to the police.The first time I described his behavior, the police would not take a report.  No crime had taken place, they said.  I told the police how this man had pulled his rusty, broken-windowed van next to me as I walked down the sidewalk, shouting “get in!” after months of explicitly shouting comments about my body.  I told them he had been harassing other women, that I was embarrassed to walk in my own neighborhood, and that I was worried he would escalate. Ok, but did he touch you, they wanted to know.  He hadn’t. I went home.

It wasn’t until after my third visit to the police station, many months later, that this man was finally charged – with stalking.  I had given the police detailed lists of the street harassment I’d experienced, and I remember thinking “it shouldn’t be this difficult.”  The charge was ultimately dismissed.

Although I am frustrated that the legal system failed to hold a serial street harasser accountable for his inappropriate behavior, Hollaback’s work gives me hope that in speaking out against street harassment, our voices do have an impact, even if not immediately.Every shared story of street harassment says I do not accept this and joins with other stories to make it clear that street harassment will not be tolerated.  Hollaback reminds us that we don’t have to be silent, that our experiences deserve to be taken seriously, and also reminds the world to listen.

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Stalking, Story, Verbal

Emily’s story: “I was told I couldn’t press charges because he hadn’t actually done anything to me. But he did do something to me.”

In August of 2011, my city held a “clean commuting challenge” to encourage people to walk, bike, carpool, etc. to work. Having recently moved from a city where walking was very much a part of my lifestyle, I was excited for the opportunity to get into the habit again — exercise, fresh air, saving my gas money. So all week long, I walked the one mile each way to and from work. And I felt great.

But on Friday, everything changed.

I was about a third of the way home when I crossed the railroad tracks, and a young man came out of the barbershop nearby. He watched me pass, whistled, and said something derogatory. I ignored him and kept walking, as I always did in such instances. But this time was different. This time, he followed me, and continued to “talk” to me, with increasingly angry comments. “Too good for me huh,” “White girl with her nose in the air,” and some other, more personal things too profane to repeat here.

I was terrified. I didn’t know what to do. I had no mace, no self-defense training. Didn’t know anybody in the area yet. Cars zoomed by on Grand River Avenue, but nobody was paying any attention. I felt completely powerless.

Finally, he stopped talking. But he kept following me. I tried walking faster. He sped up, too. I tried slowing down to let him pass me. He slowed down, too. Finally I turned down my street, thinking he wouldn’t dare turn and follow me, not with an elementary school right there on the corner. But the schoolyard was empty, and no one was around on my street. And he kept following me.

A few doors down from my house, I walked up the driveway of a neighbor’s house and hid behind it, imagining that he would think this was my house and his little game would end there. I waited, watching the time. Five minutes passed. I peeked out from the side of the house — and there he was, standing on the sidewalk, arms folded. Watching me. Waiting.

I finally called 911 and when the police came, he tried to run away. They caught him and took him in, but had to let him go the next day. I was told I couldn’t press charges because he hadn’t actually done anything to me.

But he did do something to me.

I never walked to work again. I never felt safe in my neighborhood again, or even in my own house — as close as I was to the street, I kept imagining he, or someone like him, might be waiting outside for me.

Eventually, I moved to a different neighborhood. But I still don’t walk anywhere by myself. And I feel angry about it. A man can walk around practically anywhere he wants and have no fear. But a woman has to be told, has to feel, it’s not safe.

It’s not fair.

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63+

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public masturbation, Story

HOLLA ON THE GO: “They didn’t even file a report”

I was leaving a store, and I saw a man staring at me, sitting in his car parked next to mine. Then I realized he was masturbating. Called the police; by the time they got there he had stopped. They didn’t even file a report. I would have liked to press charges, but I don’t know who he was, and they didn’t bother to take down his info.

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30+

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