Article

A Week in Our Shoes: 2/10/12

Me and Councilmember Ferraras

BY EMILY MAY

Hello Hollaback! supporters and revolutionaries!

Take a look at this week ‘s HOLLAnews and updates with our latest installment:

- Awesome Collaborations: We spent the week hanging out with Jenn Sayre and Marigail Sexton from national bystander campaign, Greendot, hammering out our collaboration with them, which will include trainings on how to be a bystander administered by our site leaders.  To learn more about our soon-to-launch bystander initiative, see our “I’ve Got Your Back” campaign video.

- Out and About: I was honored to be invited to Council Member Julissa Ferrera’s State of the District address on Thursday in Jackson Heights where she discussed her ongoing commitment to ending street harassment.  Plans for the coming year include holding the 2nd annual street harassment hearing in April and a community safety audit in Elmhurst/Jackson Heights.

- In the Press: Hollaback! and Hollaback! Baltimore got a shout out from North Baltimore Patch columnist Mike Moran.

Thanks Hollaback! supporters for another fantastic week of fighting street harassment and keeping the revolution alive!

HOLLA and out!

Emily

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Article

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month!

This is your opportunity to use your time, hands, feet, voice and general awesomeness to raise awareness of teen dating violence in the month of February!

The statistics featured on the Teen-Dating Violence Awareness Month website are staggering: One in three teens in the US is a victim of physical, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner; nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year; one in three teens in the US is a victim of physical, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner; only 33% of teens who were in an abusive relationship ever told anyone about the abuse; and 80% of parents believe it is not an issue.

But together we can change this! There’s an abundance of ways that you can get involved to make teen-dating violence not only common knowledge but a thing of the past. Here’s some ways in which you can alter the course of history:

- Download the teen-dating violence factsheet and check out these resources to get clued-up so you can spread the word to all you know.

- Make your own or order the official stickers through the Let Your Heart Rule Campaign.

- Write a Letter: Use our templates to petition the leaders in your community to celebrate February with you.

- Join a Group: Join the movement against dating abuse by joining already existing campaigns.

- Host an Event: Organize a press conference, poetry slam or play – you name it we have the tools you need to get started.

- Write an Op-ed: Make your voice heard across your entire community by writing an op-ed. We have a template, writing tips and submission ideas to get you going.

-Post About It: Spread the word by posting a virtual message or actual poster about Teen DV Month.

Teen DV Month is now in its third year of existence. It is celebrated by leaders in government student bodies, schools, youth service providers, community-based organizations, parents and now you! So get organizing and make a change so the next generation won’t have to.

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demonstration

E.A.’s Story: “I holler back”

One afternoon this summer I was biking home from our local bike co-op when I pulled up to a red light next to one other vehicle. The light had just turned red when I stopped and almost instantaneously the windows of the car next to me rolled down and two men in the car began shouting at me. The driver was quietly saying sexual threats that I could hardly hear under a passenger yelling “I like your bike. Is it a nimbus 2000? Is it Lance Armstrong’s bike? You’re really cute.” It seemed harmless enough until I heard the driver shout “I want to put my dick in your helmet… I want to put my dick in your ass.” As soon as the light changed, I found an alternate way home to ensure that the car couldn’t follow me home. The whole time it was happening I was heartbroken that the woman in the front seat didn’t try to stop them from harassing me. I am a very femme-presenting man and I will not let ignorance keep me from living openly. I holler back.

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Article, Stalking, Uncategorized

“Stalker is a Harsh Word, I Prefer Valentine”

BY CATHERINE FAVORITE

This year Target is selling one Valentine’s Day card that draws only the sound of crickets and tumbleweeds rather than laughter. The front of the card reads:

 

“Stalker is a harsh word” and the inside says: “I prefer Valentine”.

 

Considering that 54 percent of female murder victims reported being stalked, this is one crime that should never be equated with love.  Regardless of your feelings about Valentine’s Day, it should go without saying that there is never a good time to make light of stalking, especially not on a day that is supposed to be about letting the people in your life know you care about them. Apparently, Target has not gotten the memo, yet.

 

By making light of what is a serious, terrifying and potentially violent crime for 1 in 12 women and 1 in 45 men in the United States, Target is normalizing the message that stalking is acceptable behavior. Even worse, they are diminishing the concerns of victims of stalking and contributing to the dangerous attitude that one should not report it to the police. So Hollabackers, let’s call Target out on their insensitivity! By signing this Care2 petition, you will help send a message to Target that jokes about stalking are not edgy or humorous.

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demonstration

Megan’s Story: “He wanted me to be passive”

I was pumping gas when a group of teenage boys pulled up to the intersection. They rolled the windows down and one began yelling things – starting with “pump that gas, girl.” I looked up then turned to ignore him. He kept yelling, getting more suggestive but not explicit.

After months of walking to the bus to yells of “hey, girl” or horns being honked by anonymous drivers, I was fed up. So I flipped him off and yelled, “f**k you, come say it to my face, you little chickenshit.” And there was silence. Then I heard a weak, “that’s not very nice.” And they drove away.

I love his response. He wanted me to be passive, afraid, shamed, an object of his attention. My aggression set him back. I’m sure he won’t forget it soon. I wouldn’t recommend my method to anyone, but considering my audience and genuine willingness to fight it was fitting.

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Uncategorized

Shawna’s Story: Courage to speak

My friend L. was walking to work and from behind she heard a guy say “Hey Sweetheart”. She kept walking and never saw the guy. She brought it up at work, obviously frustrated, but didn’t see the point in “making a big deal out of it” because she has to deal with it all the time. I think that is WHY we women have to deal with it all the time, because we force ourselves to bury it away and NEVER deal with it. The more people can know that objectifying or degrading comments make us feel like crap, then maybe it will happen less. Or maybe we can have the courage to speak out when it does happen. And yeah, even “Hey sweetheart” can make you feel weird when you don’t know the person saying it & they’re behind you and you haven’t seen their face and all you wanted to do was walk to work without being reminded that society views you as a piece of meat.

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Uncategorized

Anonymous’s Story: Victory

I was walking to the train at 6am on a Sunday. A man passed me and made a comment. I was right by a deli an didn’t feel danger so I turned around and said, are you serious? I’m a woman alone, you’re a man alone, it’s 6am, it’s dark, just think about what you’re doing, just think.  He actually seemed to hear what I said, and he apologized! Victory.

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demonstration

Julia’s story: “I told him no multiple times”

I was baby sitting for my sister and brother in law while they went out to spend time with my brother in law’s brother who was in town. they came home after a night of partying and while every one else went to bed my brother in laws brother decided to get touchy. I told him no multiple times and he still continued to touch me, kiss me and grope me. He was drunk and wouldnt stop. i didnt sleep at all that night. I just want to find closer with this. it happened about 3 years ago. no charges were ever pressed(family said we would deal with it) I havent seen him since.

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Article

“Operation Creep-Be-Gone”

BY CATHERINE FAVORITE

A blogger out of the U.K. has an excellent suggestion that we would like to reiterate: “Operation Creep-Be-Gone”. Have you ever marveled at what street harassers get away with in public? Has there ever been a time when you were being followed, catcalled or made to feel unsafe in a public place and why, despite all the other people around you, you still felt unsafe or threatened?

The inspiration for “Operation Creep-Be-Gone” came from this blogger’s particular experience at witnessing another woman being harassed:

I saw a woman, on a busy Euston Road at 6pm, being hounded by a man. He wasn’t being outwardly aggressive, but he was sliming round her like a slug in an overcoat, asking questions and ignoring all clear signals (headphones in, one-word answers, refusal to make eye contact) that she wasn’t interested.

I caught the girl’s eye and mouthed “are you ok?”, to which she shook her head. So then I had a decision to make, quickly. To barge in like the Green Cross Code Man and say “STOP, letch! She doesn’t want to talk to you. RETREAT,” before blasting him with a sonic ray gun, or the alternative; pretend to be her mate.  “There you are!” I cried, launching myself on her (for if I’m going to do a good deed I may as well get a hug out of it). “Hi!” she faked, as I dragged her away. Then we stood together on the pavement miming friendly chat like a couple of am-dram actors, while Slug Man stared, lingered, and eventually slithered off back to his cabbage patch.

While this blogger rightly stepped in to help, she noted, “There must have been 20 people within view and earshot standing nearby, yet nobody else paid the slightest attention.” Does our fear of bringing unwanted negative attention onto ourselves influence a decision not to step in to assist someone, or is it because many still dismiss street harassment as a legitimate threat?

Regardless of the reasons behind this seeming ambivalence, this woman’s story serves as an important reminder to speak up, not just against your own street harassers, but to the street harassment of others, as well.

…nobody’s saying you have to leap in with your handbag swinging. Even a stern glance or a calm, disapproving presence could help. A well-timed ‘tut’ might still go some way to helping these lowlifes learn that harassing us for the simple crime of possessing ovaries is Not Ok.

The idea behind Operation Creep-Be-Gone could go a long way toward combating not only the actions of street harassers, but to countering the quiet, implicit acceptance of anyone who witnesses another person getting street harassed.

one comment 
Article

Fiat Super Bowl Ad Stereotypes Women of Color

So the latest Super Bowl controversy, aside from rapper MIA flipping the bird during her performance with Madonna, is the Fiat Car commercial starring Romanian model Catrinel Menghia. Despite Fiat revealing today that the commercial achieved the highest cumulative increase in car model page traffic, we would like to pop that balloon by cataloguing several reasons why we just plain don’t like it.

Apart from objectifying females and condoning street harassment the advert plays with some very dangerous race and gender stereotyping. The commercial portrays a seemingly dumb white guy, ogling the classically hyper-sexualized woman of color. She is seen as provocative, voiceless and tattoed, a stereotype that we should be rejecting, not reinforcing. Check it out for yourself.

 

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