demonstration

Margaret’s story: You scream, I hollaback.

I was walking home from the grocery store wearing my running clothes (I run there, walk back) and was waiting for the walk signal to cross the street. A guy driving yelled something out of his window at me, and I didn’t respond. Unfortunately, he was then stuck at a red light next to me and continuously yelled “whore” and “slut” at me since I didn’t acknowledge what he called his “compliments”. It’s pretty intimidating to be stuck on a corner while someone screams at you, and definitely not flattering or a compliment. I found this website out of frustration from this interaction. Thank you.

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Article

Introducing our first annual “State of the Streets Report”

We’ve had an incredible year, and we want to celebrate it with you. Without you, none of this would have been possible. With you, everything is possible. Thanks for everything. We can’t wait to see what we create together in 2012.

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Article

Our Revolution Will Not Be Dictated To Us: Hollaback! & Social Media

Forward by Emily May: I am not one for celebrity crushes, but boyohboy did I have one on Malcolm Gladwell.  He was so cute! So smart! So breakthrough! And then one day he wrote an article for the New Yorker called “The Revolution will not be Tweeted.“  Sigh.  Like a ghost in the night, my little crush disappeared and was replaced by funders sending me the article and asking for a response.  Gladwell’s article not only didn’t endorse the clear-and-present-revolution, it slowed us down by putting question marks in the minds of potential funders as to our efficacy.  Thanks, Malcolm.

Enter Alex.  A college senior, our 2011 summer intern, an incredible speech writer, interviewer, thinker, revolutionary and all around good guy.  We were born in the same hospital in North Carolina, nine years apart.  Alex wrote this piece for his class that takes on Gladwell better than I ever could. Read on, and rest easy that the next generation of thinkers is here.  And they’re changing the way we change the world.

 

BY ALEX ALSTON

Street harassment, as defined on Hollaback!’s website, is a form of gender violence experienced overwhelmingly by women and LGBTQ persons.  It can range from lewd comments to groping, to flashing or assault.  It is also one of the “most pervasive” forms of gender violence in the world, and unfortunately, one of the least legislated against.1  Culturally accepted, street harassment is often thought of as something a woman should be proud of or at least accept because, “Well, that is what happens when you’re an attractive woman.”  However, Hollaback!’s Executive Director, Emily May, is fighting for a world where everyone is safe and free from objection in public space.  May has tapped into the power of social media and mobile technology so that victims of street harassment have an effective and safe response.

Stationed in Brooklyn, New York, Hollaback! started as a single blog on which harassed individuals could describe their experiences with harassment and even post photos of their harasser.  Today, the organization has grown into a “young and sassy” world-wide movement led by grassroots activists from London to Jerusalem to Mumbai and the Czech Republic.2  Hollaback! site leaders, under the guidance of the New York office, tailor their sites as well as their involvement in the movement to end street harassment to their respective cultural environments, resources, and abilities.  Taken as a whole Hollaback! is a network of separate but intricately intertwined activists who are voluntarily taking on the fight to make public space safe.  New York City recently held the world’s first conference on street harassment, and May was invited to speak before the United Nations on the issue this past summer.  What started as an idea among friends has grown into an unforeseeable global effort to create social change.

Of course, change rarely comes without tension and, speaking out against oppression is often just as risk-laden as it is subversive.  The systemic implementation of this type of resistance invites even more backlash.  Again, because street harassment is a culturally accepted form of gender violence, its challengers open the door for trouble from those invested in gender hegemonies.  From individuals who consistently seek to bombard the site with negative and obscene comments (referred to as “trolls”), to those who would potentially visit physical harm on site leaders forcing them to remain anonymous, there are many threats to those involved with Hollaback!  Indeed, some sites are located in areas of the world where women have considerably less social capital and power than they possess here in the West and speaking back against patriarchal oppression is downright dangerous. In these places, being involved with Hollaback! is what Malcolm Gladwell terms “high-risk activism.”3  Gladwell borrows Stanford sociologist Doug McAdam’s phrase “strong-tie” to describe the phenomenon of high-risk activism.4   This is a piece of his larger argument that social media cannot facilitate the type of hands on, high-risk activism that social change has always relied on.  Focusing on examples of activism from the Black Freedom Struggle of the twentieth century, Gladwell charges that “we seem to have forgotten what activism is.”5  After reading his piece, however, Emily May thought one thing, “He hasn’t heard of Hollaback!6

To the extent Gladwell’s strong critique of social media and its relationship to activism helps us dispel the myth of a twitter revolution in Egypt or calls into question the idea of inevitable progress through Change.org petitions, it is valuable, even vital.  He quotes historian Robert Darnton who has written, “The marvels of communication technology in the present have produced a false consciousness about the past…”7  The narrative that “the new tools of social media have reinvented social activism” is, briefly put, misguided.8  Gladwell’s insight and critical interrogation of social media proves this.  But the fact remains that Gladwell is simply too eager to lump all things “social media” into the categories of websites such as Facebook, Twitter, online petitions, donations, and the like.  His well-intentioned skepticism of social media, (or lack of research) while illuminating, causes him to overlook any cases in which social media does in fact foster strong ties, high risk activism, and real social change.  The case of Hollaback! is an obvious one.

“The evangelists of social media,” according to Gladwell, “…seem to believe that a Facebook friend is the same as a real friend…”9  He sets out to use the Greensboro sit-ins and the Freedom Summer in Mississippi as examples of how high risk activism is centered around strong human relationships.  He cites the work of McAdam which maintains that there was correlation between the Freedom Summer volunteers who did not drop out despite the inescapable peril of their situation and those who had the most personal connection to the movement.10  His point, in summary, is that fighting for social change entails great risk at times, and a given individual is more likely to take that risk when he or she has a personal connection to what is going on.  He does not see social media as capable of reproducing this type of connection.  What Gladwell does not consider, however, is that one’s emotional stake is an issue is not limited to one’s circle of close friends.  That is, no one is necessarily precluded from participating in high risk activism because they do not have a connection to an issue through another person.  In the case of Hollaback!, street harassment is such a universal point of oppression for women across cultures, races, classes, and regions, fostering the personal connection (around the issue of street harassment), is a matter of articulating that shared experience. When asked about why Gladwell was wrong about Hollaback!’s brand of online activism May said, “He forgot that movement building has always been based on storytelling, and that storytelling creates great empathy. With empathy comes strong ties.”11 Even Gladwell himself would not argue that social media simply makes storytelling easier and more effective.

 So then a forty year old working class immigrant from the Bronx can connect with an white Ph.D. student in the Czech Republic because both of these women know what it means to be degraded, embarrassed, or frightened in public by catcalls or groping.  A common language is all these women need to feel the personal connection, the strong tie, (around the issue of street harassment) that Gladwell says is necessary for high risk activism.  Hollaback! uses Facebook, Twitter, and WordPress for something other than what Gladwell is imagining when he says “online activism.”  Bringing people with shared experiences together in safe spaces where personal connections can form and grow, where empathy can abound, is a vital part of social change.  Strong ties are formed by shared experiences, not by immediate physical or social proximity alone.  However, Gladwell is right in that immediate physical and social proximity (being a radical activist in Mississippi registering voters during the 60’s) are some of the factors responsible for shared experiences and the ensuing personal connection.  Furthermore, a personal connection on an issue does not equate to being someone’s close friend.  The examples Gladwell gives of the personal ties anchoring the Red Brigades in Italy and the mujahedeen in Afghanistan only tell half of the story.  Those individuals, while clearly closely aligned around their method of political action, were not necessarily best of friends or even close acquaintances.  So even if Hollaback! does not foster sprawling friendships it can still do the work of relationship building that is necessary to foment change.

Malcolm Gladwell’s second major point of contention with reading social media as a tool for social activism involves the fact that “Facebook and the like are tools for building networks, which are the opposite, in structure and character, of hierarchies.”12  He uses the sit-in again as well as the Montgomery bus boycott as examples of how hierarchies are necessary when high-risk activism is involved because top down organization is essential. According to Gladwell, networks cannot function to make systemic changes.  May simply thinks that he was unable envision a structure where people around the world who have never met would shift the paradigm from ‘think globally, act locally,’ to ‘collaborate globally, act locally.’13  He does concede that networks are the best structure for low-risk situations, citing Wikipedia as an example, but again, Gladwell is guilty of gross generalizations.  His idea that networks and hierarchies are irreconcilable is almost purposefully polemical.  When asked why, in her opinion, site leaders were willing to voluntarily undertake the work of Hollaback! without ever meeting its director, part of Emily’s response was:

They don’t have to hang out with me.  I’m not their “boss” and most of them will never meet me.  We built a platform so that people can take it and customize it to what they love to do — and what they think their community needs.  Then they run with it — and when the work gets dangerous they know 150 plus [other site leaders] people around the world have got their back. That’s pretty powerful.14

Hollaback!’s structure is a network inside of a hierarchy.  The Executive Director sits at the top and just under her is the International Movement Coordinator. The bloggers and site leaders are on the next rung of the ladder.  From there, each site is led by one or more individuals who, aside from general Hollaback! guidelines, are free to approach the fight against harassment however they see fit.  So if a site leader in France would like to participate in the local slut walk, no outside permission is necessary.  This is the rule across the board (within reason obviously).  If the site leaders of any given place can no longer keep it up, it simply “dies” with little to no effect on the others.  The leadership style of the New York office is very hands off, and as a result the sites look to one another for advice and suggestions, but as equals.  The Hollaback! community is very much a community.  Finally, the idea that this community operating through social media is “not a natural enemy of the status quo” is something they might expect, quite frankly, from someone who cannot relate to the lived reality of gendered oppression as it pertains to harassment in public space.15

Street harassment is a result, not of sexual attraction, but of a power dynamic.  In a patriarchal word, men exercise their power over women with embarrassment, intimidation, and violence in public places for all to see.  Hollaback! is not a Band-Aid for battered egos, it is a movement to reconfigure the relationship between genders so as to end street harassment.  Hollaback! would not be possible without the power of the nexus between social media and social activism.  Malcolm Gladwell is not wrong, he simply wouldn’t know real social change being worked through social media if he saw it, and that is his point, it is rare.  But it is happening.

1.   http://www.ihollaback.org/about/2.  May, Emily. E-mail interview. 03 Dec. 2012.3.  Gladwell, Malcolm. “Small Change : Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted.” The New Yorker 4 Oct. 2010. Print.4.  Ibid.5.  Ibid.6.  May, Emily. E-mail interview. 03 Dec. 2012.7. Gladwell, Malcolm. “Small Change : Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted.” The New Yorker 4 Oct. 2010. Print.8.  Ibid.9.  Ibid.10.  Ibid.11. May, Emily. E-mail interview. 03 Dec. 2012.12. Gladwell, Malcolm. “Small Change : Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted.” The New Yorker 4 Oct. 2010. Print. 13. May, Emily. E-mail interview. 03 Dec. 2012.14.  Ibid. 15. Gladwell, Malcolm. “Small Change : Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted.” The New Yorker 4 Oct. 2010. Print.

 

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Article

The 12 Days of Hollaback!

Thank you so much to everyone who came to our HOLLAday party this year! You can check out the photos from the event on Facebook, here.  Happy HOLLAdays from all of us at Hollaback!

On the First day of Christmas,
Hollaback! said to me
It’s my right to walk-safely!

So on the second day of Christmas,
A subway creep said to me,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the third day of Christmas,
Hollaback! said to say:
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the fourth day of Christmas,
A subway creep said to me,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the fifth day of Christmas,
Hollaback! said to say:
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the sixth day of Christmas,
A subway creep showed to me,
His disgusting penis,
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the seventh day of Christmas
Hollaback! said to me,
Put him on the net,
His disgusting penis,
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the eighth day of Christmas,
A creep tried to grab me,
Not before I smacked him
Put him on the net,
His disgusting penis,
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the ninth day of Christmas,
Hollaback! said to me,
Let’s end street harassment,
I think I’ll smack him
Put him on the net,
His disgusting penis,
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the tenth day of Christmas,
A creep jerked off in front of me,
We have the power,
To end street harassment,
I think I’ll smack him,
Put him on the net,
His disgusting penis,
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the eleventh day of Christmas,
Hollaback! said to me,
Report him to the cops,
We have the power
To end street harassment,
I think I’ll smack him
Put him on the net,
His disgusting penis,
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

On the twelfth day of Christmas,
Emily May said to me,
Join the revolution,
Report him to the cops,
We have the right
To be safe on the Subway,
I think I’ll smack him
Put him on the net,
His disgusting penis,
I’ll take a picture,
He’d like to bang that,
That’s not appropriate,
Nice rack baby,
It’s my right to walk-safely!

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Article

Sexy or Sexism? You Decide On This Fall’s Television Line Up

BY SARA SUGAR

Jointly launched by The Women’s Media Center and MissRepresentation.org, the Sexy or Sexism? campaign is redefining sexy and identifying sexism. This season, the campaign is bringing to the forefront the prevalent misrepresentation of women in the media. The campaign is monitoring the major television networks and their fall line-ups while providing a platform for honest and open discussion about identifying what really is sexy and what is just downright sexism.

The aim is to hold the media accountable for its depiction of females. In Early November the campaign invited viewers to take part in rating which new shows on television they felt were redefining “sexy” in a positive way and which ones were just plain sexist. Viewers were asked to score shows by applying letter grades (either A, B, C, D, or F, with F being the most sexist); around 1,000 people participated. The results were tallied and coming in with a B average, the show that recieved the highest letter grade for its portrayal of gender was NBC’s Up All Night; while ABC’s Man Up! was marked with the lowest grade of an F.

Rolling in with a B average from the creator and producer of Saturday Night Live was Up All Night, starring Christina Applegate and Will Arnett as new parents Reagan and Chris, dealing with not only the challenges and delights of parenthood for the first time, but also as a not-so-freqently-seen stay-at-home dad and a work-in-the-office mom.

As James Poniewozik of Time Entertainment aptly points out in Up All Night, Modern Family and TV’s Feminism for Men, what Up All Night is doing, and doing well, is writing scripts for a sitcome that just happens to have a stay-at-home dad and a work-in-the-office mom but isn’t primarily about that. In other words, NBC is presenting gender roles in a different light; not by making them the center purpose of the show, but by making them one aspect of two people’s lives.

In opposition to the refreshing take on gender in Up All Night, ABC’s Man Up! falls flat coming in with an F rating from SexyorSexism. But apparently Man Up! didn’t just fail with SexyorSexism, but with its own network! ABC has announced that Man Up! is being taken off the network’s line up. ABC cites poor ratings for the show, but with SexyorSexism urging viewers to write to ABC directly and tell them what they think of Man Up!, one can only hope that ABC executives wake up and decide to not take the sexist road to work!

To see how others shows in this fall’s TV line up were graded visit SexyorSexism.

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demonstration

Emma’s Story: Still angry

I was riding my bike and when I stopped at a red light, a guy on a scooter told me “You have a nice ass.” I gave him a nasty look and he said “What, isn’t that why you ride a bike?” I told him “That’s rude, you don’t even know me!” and rode away. But I still feel angry about it months later and think about all the reasons I ride my bike and how it is so not about getting “complements” on my body parts from random strangers. I also felt afraid at the time that he would follow and continue to harass me.

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demonstration

R’s Story: Not alone

It’s May of 2010. I and a group of my classmates, primarily female, have just finished our last final of the semester. For many of us, it is our last final of our college careers; we’ll be walking across the stage to claim our diplomas in only a couple of weeks. We’re jubilant. We’re exhausted. We’re ready to celebrate.

We gather at a bar a few blocks from the edge of campus. In the early evening it’s quiet, a bar/restaurant that doesn’t mind us shoving together enough tables to accommodate more than a dozen people. As the night wears on, the downstairs area becomes a nightclub and the crowd in the bar becomes thicker. Around midnight, most of our group trickles outside and we prepare to go our separate ways.

Two of my classmates had gone downstairs to dance maybe half an hour earlier, and we’re not willing to leave without at least telling them we’re going and making sure they have a way to get home. I elect to go back inside and collect them. There’s a man holding open the door and grabbing at girls as they walk in and out, a buddy of his watching idly from a few feet away. I dodge left and slide inside, irritated but more intent on my goal than on dealing with him.

I find my classmates a few feet inside the door, gathering their things and already on the way to join us outside. They go out the door and I follow, and as I’m stepping by the man he grabs for me again. His fingers snag on the skirt of my dress before I step away. He says something to me, more-or-less inaudible over the noise coming out of the bar but pretty obviously a come-on of the “hey baby, why are you so cold?” variety.

I blow him off with an “oh, *hell* no,” and take a few steps toward my friends, where they’re chatting in a circle a little ways away from the door.

He’s annoyed now. He accuses me of failing to find his advances charming because we come from different ethnic backgrounds. Except he doesn’t say that; what he says is, “Why not, bitch? Is it because you’re a racist?”

I fire off a response without really thinking about it: “No. It’s because you have fucking grabby hands.”

His buddy is laughing now, and that seems to push him from “annoyed” right into “pissed off.” He steps toward me. I step back, placing myself squarely between two of my friends. They both happen to be former Navy. One of them taught women’s self defense for a while. Neither of them is inattentive after noticing what’s going on. He steps back, because he’s a little less willing to harass — or assault — a woman when he realizes that she’s not alone, that there are people watching.

I don’t like to think about what he might have done if we *had* been alone. That, for me, is part of why Hollaback! is so important. It makes sure that people are always watching, and that this kind of harassment doesn’t go unnoticed or undocumented.

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demonstration

Xenia’s Story: Pushed into the corner

Holla-ing is a display of power and the culture of harassing women has long permeated into our day and age. So much so that the YMCA by my house has a designated “Women’s Workout Area” tucked away at one end of the greater equipment room, around the corner and out of view from the rest of the gym.

This may seem like a positive thing (a safe, harassment free space for women who want to work out) the problem with the existence of this space is that the male dominant gym culture has literally pushed women out of “their” space with the common, lecherous acts and comments. I’ve been victim to these before and I will continue to because of the lesser equipment that fill the “Women’s Circuit” area of the gym. Can’t we make all the YMCA a safe space?

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demonstration

Rachel’s Story: “Streetharassment is not okay”

I have plenty of stories about street harassment, but I would like to share one that has always stuck by me, and that still upsets me a little to think about.

It was the first time I ever got catcalled. I was thirteen years old and on my way home from the bus stop.
I lived in a pretty calm neighborhood at the time. The street I was walking through was empty, except for a guy who was about to get in his car, and an older lady across the street.
As I passed the guy he suddenly yelled at me and said something that roughly translates to ‘Sweetie, if we were alone right now, the things I’d do to you!’.
At the time I didn’t know what to say. I was thirteen years old. I’d just started wearing eyeliner so people wouldn’t see how insecure I was about, well, everything!
I guess what still doesn’t sit right with me is that I just walked away. I walked away from something that, right now, sounds a whole lot like a rape threat to me.

Which is why I want to say this. Street harassment is not okay. It never has been, and it never will be.
Which is why I will never stand for it again. Not when it happens to me, not when it happens to someone else. And neither should you. Hollaback!

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demonstration

Jen’s Story: Gross

My roommate and I were walking to CVS when a man crossed the street and said, “Hey, beautiful,” as he walked by my roommate.

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